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#9421 - 12/06/10 09:44 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
bill-e-g Offline


Registered: 12/01/10
Posts: 28
Loc: Loch Tablae, YNP
MSR Twin Peaks looks nice.

I've used a bunch of different stuff, bomber Winter Tent,
regular old tent, GoLite Shangri-La 1, tarp, and no tent at all.
All depends, who going with, where, what time...
Twin Peaks looks like a winner. I'm not totaly in love with
the Shangri-La 1. It does great in wind, it's just somewhat
of a pain to setup. Problem is is that if I bring it I
don't set it up on account it usually nice out...
I personally need to use it more in the snow to give a good
assessment.

So perhaps you don't think I'm making everything up, here's
a couple of trips from this year:
http://picasaweb.google.com/yosemite.chick.on/StarrKing
http://picasaweb.google.com/yosemite.chick.on/Nance

Favorite was to Echo Lake but that's not on the chick-on account.

I have some knowledge, but by not means claim to be an expert.

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#9451 - 12/07/10 09:58 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: bill-e-g]
lynn-a-roo Offline


Registered: 08/14/10
Posts: 625
Loc: OrangeCounty
I love your photos of Yosemite in Winter. I've never been to Yosemite in Winter, but I'd love to see it in Winter time IN-PERSON. I sure hope there is a person taking these photos and not a tripod. I could never camp in snow that deep without someone to snuggle with. I don't think the Pink Chicken will keep anyone very warm, but she sure is darn cute. LOVE YOUR PHOTOS LOTS! OOOPS, just saw a picture that called the Chick-On a Boy, now that's just not right, pink is for girls....my favorite color.


Edited by lynn-a-roo (12/07/10 10:01 AM)

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#9455 - 12/07/10 01:10 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: RoguePhotonic]
CaT Offline


Registered: 09/24/09
Posts: 694
Loc: Blacklick, OH (formerly SoCal)
RP - The few times I have used a Thermarest (supposedly their best - i.e., thickest -- one), I wasn't at all impressed with it. It still seemed paper thin to me. So what do you use now instead of Thermarest?

CaT
_________________________
If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them more than the miracle of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it.
- Lyndon Johnson, on signing the Wilderness Act into law (1964)

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#9457 - 12/07/10 01:25 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: lynn-a-roo]
bill-e-g Offline


Registered: 12/01/10
Posts: 28
Loc: Loch Tablae, YNP
Lynn, here's a couple more:
Echo Lake / Matthes Crest - Yose, Early April 2010
Copper Creek - SEKI, Late May 2009
The second one shows just how much snow lingers...
2009 was not a huge snow year...
In actuality the Nance set above was late May of this year.
Huge snow year. Only one of the 4 I put here that is
really winter is Starr King.

Chicky is not a blue bird. smile

Re. other options for shelter... the wife is prob. gonna
try winter hammocking over Xmass when we go into the
backcountry for 4 days. If anyone is interested I can post
the results... (I'll be bringing a single-wall 2 person
so she can bail into that if need be)

Since I'm babbling... if I was doing a REALLY long trip I
would def. wait until late March. By then the weather isn't
as unsettled and the days are much longer...

Have fun

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#9462 - 12/07/10 02:51 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
RoguePhotonic Offline


Registered: 12/08/09
Posts: 558
Loc: Bakersfield CA
Quote:
So what do you use now instead of Thermarest?


Back when I first started backpacking I bought a cheap pad from Big 5 that is black and I continue to use it. It's not very thick but has good durability.

Years ago I ditched my bed at home and began sleeping on the floor for multiple reasons but one of them was I wanted to train my body to sleep on any hard surface so that I could sleep any where and it worked just fine so I don't need any actual padding I just need insulation.

Earlier this year I bought a 2.2 ounce 1/8th thick pad to try and cut down on weight but it had no durability and got holes in it after a single use in Death Valley.
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#9465 - 12/07/10 03:59 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: RoguePhotonic]
KevinR Offline


Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 578
Loc: Manchester, NH
RP - If you want the "most for the least" in foam pads, get one made from Evazote. It's the warmest foam, most durable and most resistant to ultraviolet. There's an article at the MEC website here. MEC is like the REI of Canada - excellent stuff at a reasonable price, and they haven't forgotten their roots. I bought an Evazote from them years ago - still going strong.

As for durability of foam pads - blue foam is rather low. OTH - I bought a military issue pad thru an Army/Navy store a zillion years ago, and it just won't die. A friend and I used it one time as a sled to help a woman would had wrecked her knee. Granted, it was downhill, and mostly over snow and ice, but there were a few rocky spots, and she sat on it, held the sides, and we slithered her down the mountain about 1/2 mile on it and met the SAR unit coming after her. The pad survived fine - just a few nicks. I like it because it has some light nylon straps glued to it so it can secure it quickly.


Edited by KevinR (12/07/10 04:01 PM)

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#9475 - 12/07/10 06:44 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: KevinR]
bill-e-g Offline


Registered: 12/01/10
Posts: 28
Loc: Loch Tablae, YNP
Not sure exactly what CaT means by paper thin.
The thickness of the pad? Or the material it's made of?
The latest Neo Air from thermarest is very light and
pretty darn thick (9oz 2.5in thick)
Although it seems like it wouldn't hold up well...
I've been using one for a couple years now
(whenever they first came out with it) (2008?)
and it's still running strong after easily over 30 trips.
As for closed cell... my Z-Rest is easily 10 years old,
if not older... still works a treat ...
I prefer to sleep right on granite... so a air pad is a
welcome part of my kit.

Have fun

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#9476 - 12/07/10 08:58 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: bill-e-g]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 6944
Loc: Fresno, CA
> Not sure exactly what CaT means by paper thin.
I'm pretty sure CaT is talking about the original Thermarest self-inflating pads. Pretty thin if you aren't accustomed to sleeping on them. "Paper-thin" is an exaggeration, and if you don't take what you read here with a grain of salt, we could wind up with another huge debate. wink

The Neo-Air from Thermarest is an inflatable air mattress, completely different from the "original" Thermarest pads. Neo-Air is super light weight due to the high-tech material they use.

BTW, bill-e-g, I enjoy your unique "wild animal" pictures.
.....Oh, I just "got" the meaning of your name. grin

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#9484 - 12/08/10 04:25 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Steve C]
CaT Offline


Registered: 09/24/09
Posts: 694
Loc: Blacklick, OH (formerly SoCal)
Steve is correct as to the particular pad I was referring to. Also, I meant the fully-inflated thickness of the pad.


Originally Posted By: CaT
...seemed paper thin to me...
...was merely my perspective upon using it compared to my expectations of what it would be like prior to having actually used it, but was not an exaggeration of how it felt to me.

I'll have to take a look at the Neo-Air next time I'm in the market for a sleeping pad.

CaT
_________________________
If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them more than the miracle of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it.
- Lyndon Johnson, on signing the Wilderness Act into law (1964)

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#10136 - 01/19/11 07:59 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: CaT]
JohnCurranLadd Offline


Registered: 01/19/11
Posts: 5
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
You might look at Exped DownMat 7. Ned Tibbits seems to like them a lot and I trust his judgment. It's a down-filled air mattress that uses a pump so that moisture from blowing in it doesn't get the down wet. I just got mine so can't fully review it. One thing that I do know is nice is that you can fully inflate it, thereby maximizing the R-value, and it's still pretty comfortable. Most air-filled things get too hard when you blow them all the way up, but the down seems to keep it soft. Fabric appears quite durable. Not cheap, not UL. I think REI now carries at least some versions of it, so you could return it if it doesn't work for you.
_________________________
John Ladd
often found at groups.yahoo.com/group/johnmuirtrail/ (former moderator there)

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#10152 - 01/20/11 06:24 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: JohnCurranLadd]
Fishmonger Offline


Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 1025
Loc: Madison, WI
what's wrong with just using a double set of foam mats? I sleep on a single in summer, so that'll be extra comfy and double warm, and from what I read the foam pads have the better r-value anyway, don't get me into trouble with water freezing inside, possibly puncturing, and I really hate to pack these things in the morning as it is, even when it's warm and easy to do.

The only drawback I see with double foam is the size of these things.
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#10560 - 02/02/11 07:32 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
George Offline
Woodsy Guy

Registered: 10/22/09
Posts: 202
Loc: California
Hmmmm. I worked at Ostrander ski hut for 20 years; taught xc skiing; have taken the National Avalanche School course; and done snow surveys for 8 years. Some assorted thoughts:

yes, definitely abandon the sled idea. There's no way it'll work. I dragged a sled on Denali, but only on the Ruth glacier and up to 14,000 on the Kahiltna. When it gets steep, you can't use them. People will use them in the Sierra on roads, but never twice off-road.

I'm a little concerned with trying to re-learn skiing. Ski mountaineering is a hard-core skill for the trip you're proposing. I would recommend 3 - 5 years winter experience before attempting it on skis -- especially solo. If you're not at least an Intermediate ski mountaineer now, stick with snowshoes.

Unlikely you'll make more than 5 - 7 miles per day average on snowshoes (and probably not much better on skis either).

White gas stove. You might find open water here and there, but you might not... . A stove that has a good record for field maintenance (MSR multi-fuel or something). Whatever you use, you'll go through a LOT of gas melting snow for water. I don't think you can carry enough.

Get a good 4-season tent with a vestibule. You can find one a little over 4 lbs (check Black Diamond and North Face).

Resupply. Very few good choices: Have someone meet you at Reds Meadow. That's it. There's nothing until Kearsarge Pass.

Emergency beacon: I'm not a big SPOT fan, but for consumers, that's about all there is. They've got an app now where you can send a text (outbound) using a cell phone to the SPOT. There are few places you'll have cell coverage. Look at the GeoPro Messenger. Two way texting via Iridium satellite. It's designed for agencies to use, but can be adapted for a consumer. You should use either in tracking mode but not sure how long the batteries last. Not long enough, I don't think...

Not sure what to say about bear canisters. Bears occasionally poke around in April and May, but the odds are low.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but this is a difficult and very dangerous trip to be done solo in winter. The fact that you're asking basic questions indicates not quite having the skill set necessary for it. What's your avalanche training? You will be going through some serious avalanche terrain.

Although attractive as an adventure, these "go for it" trips rarely work out well. How about a really nice test drive: Yosemite Valley to Reds Meadow & out to Mammoth?? It's an outstanding trip; not as technically demanding; gets some travel in the spring so you might have tracks to follow; and, though there's definite avalanche hazard, it's not as bad as when you move south.

Look for a guided trip. Maybe the Sierra High Route or something.

Bartholemew did it solo in '28, but he pre-placed caches and had years of ski-mountaineering experience. Also, he'd planned to go with a partner, but the other guy had to drop out.

Oh PS: in 2007 (??) a guy doing part of the JMT on snowshoes was found in mid-June in Evolution Lake. Probably went in when the ice gave way. Something else to think about.


Edited by George (02/02/11 07:53 AM)
_________________________
None of the views expressed here in any way represent those of the unidentified agency that I work for or, often, reality. It's just me, fired up by coffee and powerful prose.

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#10573 - 02/02/11 01:17 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: George]
Fishmonger Offline


Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 1025
Loc: Madison, WI
good points - but you probably know that I won't listen grin Essentially, I am bored with 3 season backpacking and always wanted to get out there in winter. This is a goal that gets me started.

I've done quite a bit outside in the cold over the years, but never in the Sierra. Ski or snow shoe - having tried both, I know the ski setup will move better across the primarily low incline slopes of the JMT. I don't plan to ski any area that may be potentially dangerous for a less than experienced backcountry skier (e.g. Mather, Glen), but for 95% of the trail, I should be alright on ski. There's just no way I will even try to do a downhill run with a 60 pound pack on slopes you find switchbacks on in summer.

I also won't head out on this trip until I feel that I am ready for it, and that does involve a few smaller trips prior to the full JMT. It may be 2013 or later before I am ready for it, but the goal is the JMT and therefore I am working on gear and logistic issues that are specific to that trip.

Avalanches - not enough first hand experience beyond 10 days of backcountry skiing in the Alps in the 80s, when I was up there with a military training course, sleeping in snow caves, skinning and skiing while carrying 80 pounds of weapons and pack while doing so. We did the block tests, learned about slope angles, weather patters, etc - but I know I will need to do some refresher course. I also know I won't travel after a snow storm for a day or two at least, unless I am in a wooded valley to begin with. All a matter of having enough food so you can wait for more settled conditions. Hiking out before the storm and waiting for better weather is another thing - Sat phone will be with me to get daily detailed weather forecasts; Spot as backup at best. Forget the cell coverage up there.


As for the dead guy in Evolution Lake - he drowned June 13, 2005 - not the time of year anyone should dare to walk on ice. Maybe he slipped off the rocks above the lake, but that's more a thing to worry about at Palisade Lake. Some folks think he may have been out there to get water because he was found with empty bottles on him. Darwin Canyon - fitting name. I don't plan on crossing any lakes, frozen or not, even if it is a tempting shortcut (Palisade being the only real temptation in that respect because the trail heads up on a rock ledge high above the lake)

http://www.backpacker.com/survival_guide_skills_a_dozen_ways_to_die/special_article/12228?page=3

Stove - I will go with a winter-ready canister stove (inverted can), and a lightweight wood stove as backup and supplementary heater for water melt. I don't like the liquid gas stoves - complicated and not something I like to operate inside a tent - here's a very intersting read about winter use of canister stoves

http://www.fjaderlatt.se/2007/02/caffin-on-canister-stoves-in-deep-cold.html

Tent - currently I am leaning towards real tents with vestibule - Mountain Hardwear's EV2 or EV3, plenty of room and idea for winter use. Nemo Tenshi may be another option, but I can't find it for a reasonable price and it seems to have been discontinued. I've never liked tarp tents that require hiking poles, and somehow I don't really want to deal with that in snow when I may need the poles to anchor the tent.

resupply - it's not as bad as you say. If I can have somebody meet me at Reds, the same thing can be done at Muir Ranch, at Taboose Pass, at Tuolumne Meadows, etc - just gotta find the volunteer(s) who want to see some backcountry in early season.


since I first posted here, I've accumulated some new gear:

- Atomic Kailas ski with Dynafit bindings (still waiting for the skins - backordered at REI)

- Scarpa F1 boots, new Intuition liners, plus spare parts for field repair of the boots

- aluminum snow shovel

- Mountain Hardwear Wraith SL -20 degree sleeping bag (Conduit fabric to keep it dry)

- Acrteryx ski touring shell pants

- Mountain Hardwear FTX Ultra shell jacket

- Burton thermal underwear

all this was ebay stuff - paid a fraction of retail in most cases.

still need to decide on tent. Looking for a good price on a Gregory Denali pack. May get an Exped ground pad, get a wood stove (Bushbuddy or similar thing), need a down layer, sat phone can wait until next year. Also need some decent touring poles - my summer REI peak poles are ok, but I want to get something that is a lot easier to length-adjust, especially in cold conditions.

other items I still need: good gloves/mitten shells, gaiters that cover the entire boot (I may DIY what I need, as it only matters for the smaller stream crossings, the commercial products are all made for super cold climates), decent touring poles that are easily adjusted. My REI peak poles are nice, but near impossible to adjust sometimes. Need to get some CAMP XL390 ultralight crampons - my old Chouinard steep crampons are too heavy. My 1980s Stubai ice axe may also be a bit on the heavy side, but I like it since I have a custom camera mount on it.
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#10576 - 02/02/11 03:04 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
George Offline
Woodsy Guy

Registered: 10/22/09
Posts: 202
Loc: California
Well, good luck. I'm a little happier to know you're not going this year.

Quote:
I don't plan to ski any area that may be potentially dangerous for a less than experienced backcountry skier (e.g. Mather, Glen), but for 95% of the trail, I should be alright on ski.

You don't have any choice. Mather & Glen? What about getting over Whitney or Forester? Bear Creek if it's open and running? Getting down the south side of Muir below 12,000 can be really bad. The Golden Staircase?? Jeez. You can't avoid avalanche terrain on the JMT. Avalanches do not just happen on the steep passes, though those can be very dangerous. Most all of the southern canyons of the Sierra are swept side to side by avalanches that start 3,000 feet above the canyon floors. Avalanches are very local knowledge specific. There are good general rules, but different regions (pacific, interior ranges, Rockies etc.) all have their own tricks. I would never ski in Utah without an experienced local with me.

Wait, you're not implying you'll carry snowshoes for the steeper terrain? As if that's somehow safer (insert icon of guy banging head on brick wall...)? Maybe I misread 'cause that's not an improvement... .

Quote:
As for the dead guy in Evolution Lake - he drowned June 13, 2005 - not the time of year anyone should dare to walk on ice. Maybe he slipped off the rocks above the lake, but that's more a thing to worry about at Palisade Lake. Some folks think he may have been out there to get water because he was found with empty bottles on him.


No. He was found with his snow shoes on and had been dead for quite sometime. The ranger had just come on duty for the season and found him. There were no "rocks" or slope to fall from. He was in the upper end of Evolution Lake and was most likely crossing the ice. After about late April, I wouldn't cross any lake ice (though I have, it's just a really bad idea however tempting).

So ok. If you're going to come up to speed over a few years, that's great. But I would really, really encourage you to get better at skiing then take a guided trans-Sierra. Either the High Route with one of the Bishop guide services, or the Yosemite trans-Sierra by yourself or with Yosemite Mountaineering School. The High Route will be as realistic intro to the JMT terrain as you're going to get and the Bishop area guides are all good. You'll learn a lot, absolutely guaranteed.

There's a reason only a handful of people have skied the JMT solo. All of them I know have been incredibly experienced mountaineers. In my semi hard-core skiing days, I was lucky because I skied with a group of really experienced people. We learned from each other and, as important, lived where we skied. We knew the changes in the snow from storms and melt on a day by day basis. We had a great feel for the terrain but all of us have made near-fatal mistakes.

With far more experience than you'll have in two years, I took a "simple" fall near Tuolumne and broke my femur. Had to be medivaced by helicopter. But the good news is I at least had someone with me to go for help.

Quote:
good points - but you probably know that I won't listen I am bored with 3 season backpacking and always wanted to get out there in winter.


The two are not mutually exclusive: listening to experienced Sierra mountaineers does not stop you from going out in winter. The only point I'm making is to do so safely -- Not putting others at risk who may have to rescue you because you've chosen a trip that has a high probability of being beyond your skill level, even in two years.

If you don't do a couple of trips before hand that require a similar skill-set in that type of terrain, you won't know you're not ready.

Sigh.

George
_________________________
None of the views expressed here in any way represent those of the unidentified agency that I work for or, often, reality. It's just me, fired up by coffee and powerful prose.

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#10584 - 02/02/11 04:57 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: George]
Mike Condron Offline


Registered: 11/05/09
Posts: 215
Loc: Now Manteca, CA
"Not putting others at risk who may have to rescue you"

Very likely a recovery.

I've done the JMT in late summer. I wouldn't dream of doing it solo in winter. The south side of Muir is scary even in summer. I wondered "How in the hell do they get horses to go down this thing. There was another pass that had a south side slope where the trail was barely cut out of a very steep slope. I wondered while on it what it would be like in winter.


Edited by Mike Condron (02/02/11 05:01 PM)
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#10595 - 02/03/11 05:43 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: George]
Fishmonger Offline


Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 1025
Loc: Madison, WI
Originally Posted By: George
Quote:
As for the dead guy in Evolution Lake - he drowned June 13, 2005 - not the time of year anyone should dare to walk on ice. Maybe he slipped off the rocks above the lake, but that's more a thing to worry about at Palisade Lake. Some folks think he may have been out there to get water because he was found with empty bottles on him.


No. He was found with his snow shoes on and had been dead for quite sometime. The ranger had just come on duty for the season and found him. There were no "rocks" or slope to fall from. He was in the upper end of Evolution Lake and was most likely crossing the ice. After about late April, I wouldn't cross any lake ice (though I have, it's just a really bad idea however tempting).



Maybe we aren't talking about the same event, but this guy was dead for about 2 weeks when he was found, and the ranger did not find him.

Quote:
http://www.kaweahcommonwealth.com/07-15-05-2features.htm - about mid page you find:

Fateful journey:
The life and times
of a Sierra backpacker

He was discovered because of hikers who saw his red backpack floating in Evolution Lake and reported it to Bob Kenan, a Kings Canyon National Park backcountry ranger. Bob, who has been stationed at various posts in the backcountry of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks for more than 30 seasons, is stationed this year at the McClure Meadow Ranger Station along the John Muir/Pacific Crest Trail, about five miles from the lake.
As was reported in the July 1 issue of The Kaweah Commonwealth, the backpack was too far out in the partially-frozen lake for Bob to retrieve, so he radioed for assistance. Rangers, equipped for a dip in ice water, were flown in the next morning and discovered this was more than a recovery of someone's pack because there was a body attached to it.
The body was retrieved and delivered to the Fresno County Coroner and identified as Peter Spoecker, age 64, of Joshua Tree. End of story, right?
Not so fast. As I wrote the story that week, the victim's name — Peter Daniel Spoecker — sounded hauntingly familiar, but I couldn't quite place it... a musician, perhaps? But I was on a deadline and didn't have time to research this hunch.
Another item that nagged at me long after the story was published was the fact that Ranger Bob noted that the last entry in the logbook at Evolution Lake was June 13, suggesting that this was when Peter arrived there, yet his body was not discovered until two weeks later on June 27.
In answer to my question, the local Park Service information officer responded that there were no reports of overdue hikers in the parks. But she did verify that the backpacker was well-equipped for the current snowy conditions.
An Internet search revealed that there is a musician and music producer named Peter Spoecker, who specializes in making and playing the didgeridoo, an indigenous musical instrument of Australian Aborigines. Upon discovering his website, I was able to determine that this Peter Spoecker was also from Joshua Tree and in the same age range as the Kings Canyon backpacker.
After a couple of tries, I made contact with Grahm and Trish of The Didgeridoo Store in Oakhurst.

"Yes, it is the same Peter Spoecker," they replied sadly. "We are still in shock about his passing as he was a very dear friend, like family to us."
When asked why Peter would not have been reported as overdue when he failed to return as scheduled from his backcountry trip, they explained: "Peter would always go out hiking for weeks at a time, sometimes coming home from trips early and sometimes extending his trips without notice."

"We never thought anything of it when he was two weeks late on his 'scheduled' return from this trip," they continued.
Although an official cause of death has not yet been released, Peter most likely drowned or succumbed to hypothermia after falling through ice into the lake.
According to his trip itinerary, filed when he obtained his backcountry permit from Inyo National Forest, Peter set out from North Lake in Inyo County. He would have traveled southwest on-trail to Lower Lamarck Lake, then cross-country to Lamarck Col, a pass that, at 12,900 feet above sea level, would have required 3,500 vertical feet of scrambling over snow and ice.
Still off-trail, he then descended into Darwin Canyon before meeting up with the John Muir Trail on the north end of Evolution Lake — often described as one of the most beautiful locales in all of the Sierra — and directly beneath Mount Darwin, which, at 13,830 feet elevation, is the highest summit in the area.

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#10607 - 02/03/11 01:01 PM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
George Offline
Woodsy Guy

Registered: 10/22/09
Posts: 202
Loc: California
Quote:

Maybe we aren't talking about the same event, but this guy was dead for about 2 weeks when he was found, and the ranger did not find him.


Same incident for sure. For whatever it's worth, you're right that the ranger, Bob, didn't find him. But when it was reported, he went up that evening. There was little doubt in his mind it was a body under the backpack but he couldn't tell for sure. Also, he was two weeks overdue (and unreported). Good chance he'd died even before that.

As noted before, there's nowhere around there to fall in from. He was likely crossing the lake.

But critical to this discussion is:

1) solo hiker
2) on snowshoes
3) crossing frozen lake
4) bloop

g.
_________________________
None of the views expressed here in any way represent those of the unidentified agency that I work for or, often, reality. It's just me, fired up by coffee and powerful prose.

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#10661 - 02/06/11 09:58 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
catpappy Offline


Registered: 03/06/10
Posts: 120
Loc: acworth, ga
Fishmonger, I think you'll be fine with a remote canister stove. Of course you know about keeping the canister warm by sleeping with it or keeping it in a deep jacket pocket. One trick that I've used in the past is to stick a chemical toe warmer to the side of the canister. This works great, but only if you place canister and toe warmer in a sock or wrap in some sort of cloth. I spent two nights out last Jan. where morning lows were 6 and 8 degrees. I purposely did not sleep with the canister to retest the toe warmer idea. Had a rip roaring output each time. On the down side, toe warmers can be heavy if you are on an extended trip and have to carry a lot. Also, altitude is a canister stoves friend. Higher altitude = lower atmospheric pressure = easier for pressurized contents to free itself from container. But, you've got to have some warmth for vaporization.

To conserve fuel, be as efficient with your cooking as you can be. Use a windscreen and on the ground heat reflector. I've read wind can increase boiling times by three. Use a black pot versus a shiny pot. 25% better heat transfer they say. Take black trash bags and fill with snow. On a sunny day you will get good melt from this, taking the melting time out of the equation.

For any extended trip, test your canisters before you leave. Make sure they screw on correctly and you get fuel delivery to the burner.

I've been using a MSR Windpro for the last 4 years and have had no problems with it.

John

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#10861 - 02/15/11 05:46 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: Fishmonger]
wagga Offline


Registered: 10/07/09
Posts: 2183
Loc: (3 ˙dod) ɥɔ;...
Does this hybrid look interesting to you?
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#10865 - 02/15/11 07:49 AM Re: help me get ready for a Muir Trail snow shoe trip [Re: wagga]
Fishmonger Offline


Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 1025
Loc: Madison, WI
Originally Posted By: wagga
Does this hybrid look interesting to you?


I think I had something like that when I was 10 years old grin
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