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Lunch on the trail
#12267 04/01/11 11:58 AM
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In light of the fact I have decided to go forward with my 95 day hike this summer I once again have to consider what I can do on the trail for food.

Dinner and breakfast are easy meals but the one that always causes me problems with ideas is lunch. No one wants to have to stop and take out a stove and cook so other then the typical food such as G.O.R.P., bars of some kind, peanut butter & crackers etc what sort of foods do any of you find make a good lunch meal?

In the past I have done salami & cheese on tortillas but I have pretty much lost the desire for that and it also is not practical in a resupply package.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12268 04/01/11 12:19 PM
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MooseGoo. On crackers, tortillas, apples, etc. Google it.

Re: Lunch on the trail
Go Bears #12270 04/01/11 12:42 PM
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Whoa! I'll have to make a batch of that and try it.

          Moose Goo

Re: Lunch on the trail
Steve C #12276 04/01/11 03:25 PM
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Mmmmmmmm, Pemmican! Modern version with Crisco butter-substitute shortening (OK or rendered bear fat if you kick it old school), variety of dried fruits & nuts: cranberries, blueberries, strawberries, pineapple, mango, papaya, apricots etc. pistachios, cashews, macs, almonds etc. Different flavor every day. Never another raisin or peanut. Keeps at room temp, forms to whatever shape fits best. Especially for long distance hikes: high fat content in nuts and shortening: fat is much more efficient energy by weight. 9 cal/gm vs 4 cal/gm for carbs & protein. For every additional ounce of fat you carry, eliminate 2+ ounces of carb or protein. And how do you spell flavor? F-A-T. Wash down with real lemonade or limeade made from powdered juice. Mmmmm.


Wherever you go, there you are.
SPOTMe!
Re: Lunch on the trail
saltydog #12296 04/01/11 07:29 PM
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I recall DUG's claiming that cans of frosting were his favorite trail snack. He would take them on his marathon hikes -- mostly walking, very little stopping to sleep.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12302 04/01/11 07:47 PM
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That stuff sounds interesting. As long as it wouldn't dry out after sitting in the tube for 2 months. Some of my resupply packages will probably be assembled up to 3 months before getting to them.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12307 04/01/11 08:43 PM
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I can't imagine a combination of peanut butter and honey drying out too much in a few months, especially if stored in a tube that is at least semi-air tight.

I'm really looking forward to trying this Moose Goo. The tubes are on the list for my next REI visit, and I'll throw some together for my next hike for sure.


One day I'd like to hike the entire John Muir Trail and not leave a single footprint. -Randy Morgenson
Superfood
RoguePhotonic #12434 04/05/11 10:34 AM
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These are awesome, and you can customize the ingredients...I use Justin's for my nut butter base...

Disco's Homemade Energy Bars

Re: Superfood
Jean-Guille #12587 04/08/11 05:45 PM
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I just read in Backpacker magazine that Bridgford food has ready to eat sandwiches kind of like MREs but better. No refrigeration or heating required and there individually wrapped and have a 3 year shelf life if stored at 80 degrees or less the website is: Bridgford Foods

Re: Superfood
HyltonHiker #12603 04/09/11 03:49 AM
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Originally Posted By: HyltonHiker
I just read in Backpacker magazine that Bridgford food has ready to eat sandwiches kind of like MREs but better. No refrigeration or heating required and there individually wrapped and have a 3 year shelf life if stored at 80 degrees or less the website is: Bridgford Foods

I've seen those at REI. They scare me... shocked

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12607 04/09/11 11:27 AM
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I have heard about those. I thought about the idea of if you had those then bring some honey mustard or something and it might be very good.

They sort of scare me to though lol.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12616 04/10/11 04:57 AM
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Ive never tried any of those products myself I just saw the add in Backpacker magizine and thought WOW! this could be good,finally I dont have to eat trailmix bars for lunch which can get old real fast. I normally eat a big breakfast like a MountainHouse and a few packages of oatmeal which packs lots of carbs and it usually holds me over till dinner,but those sandwiches from Bridgeford will be something I will have to experiment.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12617 04/10/11 06:30 AM
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Amazon sells individual (restaurant) sized containers of peanut butter, nutella, jelly. High fiber (flax) minibagels and wraps last forever without drying out or crushing and taste good.

I have been toying with trying a homemade/reconstitutable chicken salad from dried chicken, mayo packets, and dried fruits (apples, cranberries)and veggies (celery). Amazon sells chicken in 7 oz pouches (like tuna) but that is heavy for LD hiking.

Also I have had thoughts about making a Doctor McDougall noole bowl or soup at breakfast in a wide mouth nalgene bottle and eating it as a leftover at lunch at ambient temperature--no more weight than carrying the equivalent in water if you are hiking in a dry area.

Re: Lunch on the trail
Steve C #12618 04/10/11 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted By: Steve C
I recall DUG's claiming that cans of frosting were his favorite trail snack. He would take them on his marathon hikes -- mostly walking, very little stopping to sleep.


LOL a five year old's dream lunch! Now fess up: how many of us stuck a finger into a cake a stole a big dollop of frosing when the grownups had their backs turned?

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12619 04/10/11 10:06 AM
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The trouble with those sandwiches is they don't have a ton of calories and are a bit expensive for lunch. If I spent 15 dollars a day for total consumable supplies on this hike my cost would be 1500 dollars. But I can easily average less then 2 dollars for dinners and 2 for breakfast. If I ate only 1 of those sandwiches for every meal at REI's price not including tax or shipping it would be 450 dollars for lunch. Throw in beef jerky that averages 30 dollars a pound and it adds up.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12620 04/10/11 10:41 AM
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Agree with the expense issue.

Have you tried any home dryer/home dried foods? Homemade stews and noodle dishes can be reconsituted with a bit of boiling water from an alcohol burner. Just need to factor in a long lunch break instead of eating on the run.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12622 04/10/11 11:48 AM
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No I have never put anything together myself like that. It would probably be better in the long run. But besides a long and messy lunch it would mean more fuel also.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12623 04/10/11 12:02 PM
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the classic marmot poop sandwich won't break the bank:



squeezable cheddar cheese, minimus.biz procured about a year ago. That stuff will last forever.

Nutella also a favorite, and we don't even bother with the small packages. Just pack a half pounder plastic jar for a 8 day stretch. It'll get eaten grin

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12631 04/10/11 04:30 PM
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Have you seen the pre-cooked bacon in the grocery stores? (Oscar Meyer Ready to Serve Bacon). The box contains a vacuum sealed package of about 16 strips of bacon, and the shelf life is about 5 months. Not too much weight. I've taken some on overnights, and have some for breakfast and lunch, without heating up the bacon. The package mentions to refrigerate after opening the plastic pouch, but I took some on a 3 day hike with no problem without refrigeration.

Re: Lunch on the trail
RoguePhotonic #12633 04/10/11 05:07 PM
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Blah Fish that stuff reminds me of my 2009 trek when you ran into me. I had crackers like that made out of rye bread with a cheese spread. The rye bread was so disgusting I could not choke it down after 3 days on the trail. My lunch then consisted of squeezing that cheese into my mouth and eating a Snickers bar that did not do much for me either. sick

I don't know about the bacon. Could catch fish and stuff bacon into their bellies and fry them up.

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