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#17914 - 08/29/11 07:59 PM Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney
Julie Offline


Registered: 03/31/11
Posts: 20
Loc: California
Hi all -- My husband and I plan to do Whitney on an overnight permit on September 4 -5. I've been reading this forum and wondering if I could get some advice.

a) Onion Valley vs. Portal: We're spending 2 nights camping to acclimate. Is it worth staying at Onion Valley at 9200 vs Portal at 8300 or so. Will the extra 900 feet make a difference? Are there other advantages to staying at Portal?

b) Outpost vs. Trail: Current plan is to camp at Outpost and try to Summit the next day, and make it back to camp at Outpost again. Is it worth it to try to make trail? I'm concerned I won't feel like eating and get a headache camping at 12,000 feet.

c) Water from Trail to Summit: I've got a prescription for Diamox and read you need more water. Will 3 L be enough? I weigh 110 lbs.

d) Pack weight: I've read that you should not carry more than 25% of body weight. Is is true that men can carry more? I'm trying to tell my husband that. He's almost there.

e) Food: Any good suggestions on food? My husband doesn't really like freeze dried. But he doesn't want to do dishes. Are there easy non-freeze dried foods (besides PB&J). I pretty much lose my appetite for anything except chocolate and nuts, but altitude does not affect him. We've tried several, including Mary Jane's and Mountain House and wonder if there's something else.

f) Weather: I was wondering how cold it gets at night? I was planning on bringing at 40 degree bag and a Pantagonia down sweater and gloves but looking at pictures, it doesn't look that cold. We have a tent. I'm wondering if I can ditch the down sweater and just bring a fleece vest.

Thanks in advance, any advice is appreciated !!

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#17917 - 08/29/11 08:21 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
tdtz Offline


Registered: 08/26/10
Posts: 511
Loc: CA
a. No opinion on Onion Valley. I heard it is beautiful and has some very nice hikes. But I have never been there. The extra altitude can't hurt.

b. I'd go for consultation lake just short of Trail camp. But it is pretty barren up there...no trees.

c. Last year I drank 2L between the switchback springs and the summit. 1/2L from the summit back to the switchback springs. I'm twice your size and I was taking diamox (62.5mg x 2). I was not dehydrated.

d. Don't know the guidelines on packweight vs bodyweight. I'm sure I could carry 60lbs, but I certainly wouldn't want to. I got my pack down to 30lbs on my recent trip to Meysan Lake.

e. Food...everyone will say, bring food that you know that you like. It isn't a good time to experiment with foods. I personally like foods that are nice and moist..on the wet side. The air is dry up there and dry foods can be hard to get down (I did a lot of sip and swallows).

f. Last year I went up 9/6-7. It was right around freezing at trail camp. The wind starting at trail crest made it pretty damned cold up there. I had a 32F bag last year. It is possible to have true winter storms on Whitney at this time of year. My reaction to last year's trip was to buy a 15F bag for this year.

Hope this helps....and of course, there are other opinions that you will likely hear.

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#17918 - 08/29/11 08:32 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
I did the same trip you envision last year at the same time, with a pretrip to Onion Valley. My trip report, which includes the food we ate, is here, pictures included. Now, to get to your questions.

Originally Posted By: Julie
a) Onion Valley vs. Portal: We're spending 2 nights camping to acclimate. Is it worth staying at Onion Valley at 9200 vs Portal at 8300 or so. Will the extra 900 feet make a difference? Are there other advantages to staying at Portal?


No contest, the extra feet,and extra peace and solitude, are worth it. You will sleep better because you won't be hearing people all night long scaring away bears, packing up, blah blah blah (though Onion Valley does have some bears) And you can do some great acclimatizing hikes at Onion Valley (Kearsarge Pass!). When I did Whitney as a first timer last year, it was 2 nights at Onion Valley for me, no regrets. You do have another choice, though -- Horseshoe Meadows -- which is nearer to the Portal and to Lone Pine.

Originally Posted By: Julie
b) Outpost vs. Trail: Current plan is to camp at Outpost and try to Summit the next day, and make it back to camp at Outpost again. Is it worth it to try to make trail? I'm concerned I won't feel like eating and get a headache camping at 12,000 feet.


Tough one. I've done Trail Camp on both my overnighters to the summit, no regrets (I camped at Outpost Camp once with my dog, also, when I had no intention of summiting). But Outpost Camp is prettier and you'll sleep better (although Outpost Camp gets noisy at 3 to 4 am as people start hiking through). How much weight are you carrying? What I would do is see how you feel when you get to Outpost Camp. If you feel good, go for Trail Camp. Getting to Trail Camp will increase your chances of a successful summit, sleep or no sleep, in my opinion (others may differ), because overnighting at 12,000 will help you with the summit push, and instead of facing a sudden 4,500 feet jump in elevation, you will be looking at only 2,500. But be warned: some folks think the section between Outpost Camp and Trail Camp is exhausting with a backpack. If you backpack is much over 25 lbs ... well, depending on your fitness, might not be fun.

Originally Posted By: Julie
c) Water from Trail to Summit: I've got a prescription for Diamox and read you need more water. Will 3 L be enough? I weigh 110 lbs.


I am a female who weighs a little more than you, and I take Diamox (very low dose, now only 62.5mg once a day before sleeping at altitude), and 3 liters is fine for me for that part. Your experience may differ. If this is your first time using Diamox, try it at sea level first for a few days long before your trip (like, right now) to see how it affects you. At my low dose, I haven't really experienced that much increased diuretic effect, to be honest; I often experience that effect at altitude with or without Diamox, and I think that is normal.

Originally Posted By: Julie
d) Pack weight: I've read that you should not carry more than 25% of body weight. Is is true that men can carry more? I'm trying to tell my husband that. He's almost there.


Yes, but there is a question how much you have each been training with. You really should keep your pack to 25 lbs if you can (it is doable). Especially if you are not going to train with a similar weight pack ahead of time. We had an athlete, experienced hiker, in our group of 3 who did not heed this advice last year; she crashed at Outpost Camp, and my friend and I each had to take some of her weight so that the three of us could get to Trail Camp.

Originally Posted By: Julie
e) Food: Any good suggestions on food? My husband doesn't really like freeze dried. But he doesn't want to do dishes. Are there easy non-freeze dried foods (besides PB&J). I pretty much lose my appetite for anything except chocolate and nuts, but altitude does not affect him. We've tried several, including Mary Jane's and Mountain House and wonder if there's something else.


Tortillas, packages of tuna fish or chicken, Ramen Noodles, cheese, salami. But for dinner, I would go with freeze dried dinners, because you need as close to a real meal as possible to get the calories to get you up the mountain. There are alternatives to what you see at REI. Check out http://www.trailcooking.com/. You can learn how to cook in a ziploc bag there (no dishes, just eat out of the bag!)

Originally Posted By: Julie
f) Weather: I was wondering how cold it gets at night? I was planning on bringing at 40 degree bag and a Pantagonia down sweater and gloves but looking at pictures, it doesn't look that cold. We have a tent. I'm wondering if I can ditch the down sweater and just bring a fleece vest.


You can get a relatively precise forecast here for Trail Camp, (slighty higher altitude, so slightly colder than what you would experience at Trail Camp.

Me, I would totally bring the down sweater. You can always use it as a pillow. All three of us wore our down last year over labor day weeekend at Trail Camp. And don't forget wind/rain protection that goes over it.

Last year, Labor Day weekend, I was barely warm enough in a 25 degree bag at Trail Camp, and that was with a silk liner. A friend was toasty in her 10 degree bag.

Have a great time!


Edited by Akichow (08/29/11 08:52 PM)

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#17924 - 08/29/11 11:12 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7880
Loc: Fresno, CA
Good advice above.

My favorite place to acclimate is Horseshoe Meadows. You camp at 10,000', and there are some nice easy hikes from there. It is 20 miles out of Lone Pine, starting up the Whitney Portal road, then turn left to Horseshoe Meadows. Here's a Trail Peak: Warmup / acclimatization hike description.

Since you are spending two prior nights at altitude, packing all the way to Trail Camp should be ok. But if your packs are heavy, you might do better stopping at Outpost. The advantage is sleeping lower (so altitude sickness issues may be reduced), and reducing the distance and fatigue of carrying heavy packs. Most people are able to day hike from Outpost to the summit.

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#17944 - 08/30/11 12:41 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Steve C]
Julie Offline


Registered: 03/31/11
Posts: 20
Loc: California
Steve C, Akichow, Tdz: I've been a huge fan of your posts. Great advice. I loved Akichow's reports, and the story about Rabbit, Steve's Gearhead advice, and Tdz's Crazy 8 and am sure there are many like me.

I weighed my pack last weekend -- 12 pounds without water and meals. With 4 L of water that'll add 8 pounds, but it sounds like I can cut it to 3 pounds. So, by my math, I can carry about 22 pounds, or 25 percent of my body weight (I weigh 110) and my Sherpa can carry 45 (he weighs 170). He's a little dubious. 12 pounds is a Golite Pinnacle XS women's pack, Marmot summer bag, Thermarest Neoair, poles, camelback, bottles, trekking poles, camera, clothes including down sweater, rain jacket, snacks. He'll carry similar but will take the tent, Big Agnes Fly Creek and footpad, the bear bin, and meals.

Main concern is the altitude factor. We've been doing Baldy which is only 10K. We did that 3 times, alternating with doing trails like Cucamonga Peak and the 3 Ts. We don't know what we'll feel like at 14K plus as the highest we've been is 11.5K. So is it better to camp at Outpost, and hopefully sleep better, or to to Trail, and risk a a headache? I think this thread has been really helpful. We'll go to Outpost and see how we feel. Try to shave as much weight of our packs as possible. We do have 20 degree bags, and also lighter 40 degree bags. I did get my husband a Western Mountaineering bag, but he didn't feel he could justify the expense for what may be a one time trip and returned it. He's just not into ultralight. I wanted a titanium kettle this weekend, and he wanted stainless. He won (but he'll be carrying it this weekend).

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#17947 - 08/30/11 12:57 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
tdtz Offline


Registered: 08/26/10
Posts: 511
Loc: CA
Hi Julie,
thank you!

I'd definitely take the 20F bag. And definitely only carry 1L of water up to trail camp (more specifically, the springs on the switchbacks). Otherwise, do have water containers for 3L for the trip to the top.

my trip report from last year.
http://www.whitneyzone.com/wz/ubbthreads.php/topics/7208/1

I always bring too much food. I really do recommend going over your menu for the trip to determine if you are bringing extra. My bag is always really reasonable until I put the bear vault in. Just looking out for your Sherpa. smile
Tom

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#17962 - 08/30/11 06:07 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: tdtz]
Ken Offline


Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 742
Loc: Los Angeles
Quote:
So, by my math, I can carry about 22 pounds, or 25 percent of my body weight (I weigh 110) and my Sherpa can carry 45 (he weighs 170).


In actuality, those 25% guidelines come from some old backpacking concepts that are long since discarded, when people carried wooden packs, wool sleeping blankets, and iron frying pans. Geez, try to go lighter. Under 20, Under 30. You'll be so much more comfortable and happier. That tent was a great start (I assume you have the two person UL, at 2lbs,2oz). You do NOT need a bunch of changes of clothes. You do NOT want to cook food, you only want to heat water. A lot of people don't even bother with hot food for a short trip like this. That gets rid of a lot of stuff.

Yep, no need to have more than a liter of water, until the push for the summit. Lots of water below trail camp. Take your time, have fun, start early.

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#17963 - 08/30/11 07:23 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Ken]
Julie Offline


Registered: 03/31/11
Posts: 20
Loc: California
Thanks Ken and TDTZ: Thanks so much for the advice on the water!! Will carry 1 L to Trail Camp - since I have a Steripen - and then switch to 3 L. I can always drink Sherpa's water if I run out.

TDTZ: Your posts, and Akichow and Bulldog's are great. I just love the pictures especially, the dog and the marmot. Also, and I am sure many first timers feel this way, the most informative posts for us are the ones done by people who are willing to share their bad experiences (as well as good) such as with AMS and how to overcoming it. The 25% of the population that NEVER have any altitude problems at all (like my Sherpa) and are fun to read about. But I think I am like most people - coming from sea level, I'm okay at 10k, but I start to get a low grade headache at 11K. This forum has been so helpful. That is why I've got the Diamox prescription, and am staying 2 nights at Onion Valley.

SHERPA WANTS ME TO ASK: How cold does it get at night at Trail Camp versus Outpost? I've relayed what I've learned to Sherpa and he said that I'm taking a down jacket. I said that I looked at the link in Akichow's post, and it looks like it gets to 32 degrees at Outpost. Sherpa wanted me to ask if anyone knows how cold it is at Trail Camp. I don't know. Sherpa now says that I need to bring long underwear. Also, I was planning on taking fleece/leather gloves.
Sherpa still is talking about camping at Outpost before we (hopefully) summit and also after. I think it is because he (secretly without admitting it) wants to drop his load. Then get up early and hike 7 miles up, and down, without the pack. And camp a second night Outpost again. But if we feel good he may change his mind.

I wonder if you can you cook regular Ramen or spaghetti in a freezer bag? I love the link on food in Akichow's post and definitely want the freezer bag approach. Most of the recipes calls for baked ramen. Anyone know if regular ramen works? Anyone know any freeze dried food that tastes really good? Unfortunately, Sherpa already ran out and bought Mary Jane's Mac and Cheese (I had told him to get the one with sugar snap peas), and he got Chicken a la King. Was going to try to get the blueberry cheesecake until I read TDTZ's post.
We will be staying at Onion Valley. Akichow's posts were the reason I made reservations a long time ago there.

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#17964 - 08/30/11 08:01 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
VersatileFred Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 130
Loc: SoCal
Originally Posted By: Julie

Sherpa still is talking about camping at Outpost before we (hopefully) summit and also after. I think it is because he (secretly without admitting it) wants to drop his load. Then get up early and hike 7 miles up, and down, without the pack. And camp a second night Outpost again. But if we feel good he may change his mind.

Another factor to consider is the terrain above Mirror Lake. The trail is more rugged up there, so it is more work to carry packs. I remember there was a post from some people who Barely Made Trail Camp. Of course, many people who train well before the hike do not mind the extra distance.

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#17965 - 08/30/11 08:25 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
Originally Posted By: Julie
Steve C, Akichow, Tdz: I've been a huge fan of your posts. Great advice. I loved Akichow's reports, and the story about Rabbit, Steve's Gearhead advice, and Tdz's Crazy 8 and am sure there are many like me.

I weighed my pack last weekend -- 12 pounds without water and meals. With 4 L of water that'll add 8 pounds, but it sounds like I can cut it to 3 pounds. So, by my math, I can carry about 22 pounds, or 25 percent of my body weight (I weigh 110) and my Sherpa can carry 45 (he weighs 170). He's a little dubious. 12 pounds is a Golite Pinnacle XS women's pack, Marmot summer bag, Thermarest Neoair, poles, camelback, bottles, trekking poles, camera, clothes including down sweater, rain jacket, snacks. He'll carry similar but will take the tent, Big Agnes Fly Creek and footpad, the bear bin, and meals.

Main concern is the altitude factor. We've been doing Baldy which is only 10K. We did that 3 times, alternating with doing trails like Cucamonga Peak and the 3 Ts. We don't know what we'll feel like at 14K plus as the highest we've been is 11.5K. So is it better to camp at Outpost, and hopefully sleep better, or to to Trail, and risk a a headache? I think this thread has been really helpful. We'll go to Outpost and see how we feel. Try to shave as much weight of our packs as possible. We do have 20 degree bags, and also lighter 40 degree bags. I did get my husband a Western Mountaineering bag, but he didn't feel he could justify the expense for what may be a one time trip and returned it. He's just not into ultralight. I wanted a titanium kettle this weekend, and he wanted stainless. He won (but he'll be carrying it this weekend).




I haven't read the other replies yet, so at the risk of being redundant:

1. Thanks for the compliments! Always appreciated!

2. You do not need to carry 3L water until you leave Trail Camp. Until that point, it is extra weight you don't need. Instead, you can carry 1L of water, and purify on the trail at the water sources whenever you get low. A steripen is great for that, but a pump is a good choice too. I fought this advice myself at first, but really, there is a ton of water on the trail, so 1L before Trail Camp is fine.

3. If you weigh 110, then 22lbs is 20 percent of your bodyweight. You may be able to go to 25. I would not go above. Unless your husband hikes a lot with a backpack, 45 is probably to heavy for him, especially if you want to have a shot at Trail Camp. You should be able to keep him to under 35 lbs. Remember, the weight we carried on our Labor Day trip was for two nights, and you are only staying 1 night I think (gear is about the same, but food is less).

4. Take the warmer bags, at least for you. 40 is nowhere near enough for a woman at this time of year (we sleep colder). And if you want to leave the option of Trail Camp open, it is not warm enough for either of you.

5. Yes, see how you feel at Outpost Camp. I know others are going to give you different advice on this. This is my perspective. If you want to reduce risk of AMS on summit day, and you are feeling good at Outpost Camp, and you have energy for what is a pretty big climb, then consider going to Trail Camp. Night is very important for acclimatization. You will have had two nights at almost 10,000 feet already, before you hit the trail. So, in all likelihood, you'll be ready for a night at 12,000 feet, which will give you a big boost on the acclimatizing for a hike to 14,500. If you recall my trip report from last year, I don't believe Rabbit would have been able to summit had we stayed at Outpost Camp rather than Trail Camp (though she probably pushed it, even so, as things played out). Now, I am not a doctor. Consult your doctor and the real experts, and take opinions on the internet with a grain of salt. What works for me may not work for you.

6. Drink a lot and do not forget the electrolytes! Very very important! And if you find yourself having to pee a lot, it may not be the Diamox ... could just be an adaptation to altitude, so just grin and bear it!

Have fun! Have fun! Really, have fun!


Edited by Akichow (08/30/11 08:29 PM)

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#17966 - 08/30/11 08:35 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
On to your second post.

1. You can definitely cook ramen in a freezer bag. Boil the water, add it to the ramen, let it sit a few minutes (you can use your hat as a "cozy"), then pour the water out. You can try this at home first (I often cook ramen at home now by just pouring boiling water in bowl that has raw ramen, letting it sit, and then draining the ramen in a seive). You can then throw whatever sauce, etc., you want into the ziploc bag and shake. Regular pasta will NOT work this way. However COUSCOUS does work with freezer bag cooking. Consider seasonining with olive oil, parmesan cheese, maybe a little canned or packged chicken... Oh yeah, some chopped nuts for salt, texture, protein and fat.

2. The link I gave you was for weather above 12,000 feet, so above Trail Camp. Therefore the temperatures you encounter at Trail Camp will be slightly warmer. A rough rule of thumb is you lose 3 degrees for every 1000 feet climbed. So, you can add 6-8 degrees from the forecast in the link I provided to approximate Outpost Camp.

3. I have to say that I agree with Ken that for a one night trip, you can get yourself to 20 lbs and Mr. Sherpa to 30 lbs or less. Sounds like you have good gear.

4. YES YOU MUST HAVE LONG UNDERWEAR, TOP AND BOTTOM, PLUS A WOOL OR FLEECE HAT, AND GLOVES. You will probably sleep in the long underwear, or you will be cold at night. You can probably take it off during the day. You need to have, at minimum, (1) long underwear bottoms; (2) synthetic pants, no cotton, zip off is great; (3) windproof/waterproof pants; (4) long underwear top; (5) down jacket; and (6) windproof/waterproof top. We had great weather last year, but the year before there was a snowstorm over Labor Day, I hear. So you have to be prepared for cold AND wet!


Edited by Akichow (08/30/11 09:02 PM)

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#17967 - 08/30/11 08:41 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7880
Loc: Fresno, CA
Doug at the W.P. store recommends people stop at Outpost Camp, too. If Sherpa is leaning that way, just do it. What would take two hours with a loaded pack (getting to Trail Camp) can be traded for starting an hour earlier in the morning from Outpost.

While the Steripen might increase your confidence, many of us old regulars just dip and drink. Here are several links for you:
Bob R's Water Sources - Main Trail and Mountaineers Route (Includes a map and pictures).
And this one: 60,000 Liters of Water Consumed -- Untreated
(Most people feel more comfortable filtering or treating though.)

It is slightly colder at Trail Camp... not sure if anyone has made any actual measurements. But it is more exposed, too. If it is windy, Outpost is better.

Ramen noodles cook just fine at altitude. You just need to simmer them a while since the water won't get as hot (lower boiling point temperature.) We enjoyed them at 10,000 last trip out. If you take spaghetti, get the vermicelli or whatever the very thin noodles are. Thicker takes lots longer! (been there done that.)

My favorite freeze dried food is always Mountain House brand. I won't even try anything else anymore.


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#17968 - 08/30/11 08:49 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
You can use this link, weather near Outpost Camp to approximate weather at Outpost Camp. This is from altitude 10,266, which is just slightly higher than Outpost camp.

While I have a somewhat different take from Steve on the sleep elevation issue (I will grab an opportunity to push the sleeping elevation incrementally higher if it is there and all systems are working), I will note that the first time I climbed any part of Whitney, I did overnight at Outpost, and hiked up to Trail Camp the next morning. The Outpost-Trail Camp section is far easier without a backpack. I had the same do-I-don't-I back-and-forth that you are now doing when I did a summit climb last Labor Day. When we got to Outpost Camp, the answer just became clear, based on the time, weather, energy level, etc. No need to worry about it ahead of time, really.


Edited by Akichow (08/30/11 09:01 PM)

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#17970 - 08/30/11 08:55 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
tdtz Offline


Registered: 08/26/10
Posts: 511
Loc: CA
Hi Julie,
last year..same time of year 9/7-8, it was pretty darn cold at trail camp. But what does that mean? I did have a water bottle that I left out that started to freeze. But that wasn't the real issue. The wind was howling like crazy. It made warm clothing pretty much mandatory at night.

As far as trail vs outpost. Something to consider is that the last 5 miles up from trail camp to the summit are the hardest. And then you've got 5 miles back for a total of 10 miles.

If you go to outpost, I think it's about 3.5 miles up the trail. That means that summit day is going to be 7.5 miles up and 7.5 miles down.

Trail as Basecamp is 6mi-10mi-6mi
Outpost as basecamp is 3.5mi-15mi-3.5mi

Ramen noodles....I prefer regular pasta as it is more dense. I pack for space as well as weight. Ramen noodles are a lot of air, so they take up more space than they are worth. spaghetti is going to be better since it packs pretty dense.

I used my thermal underwear and fleece gloves last year for the trip to the summit. And my fleece balaklava was the best!

don't forget a wind breaker!

oh....and a rain pancho...just in case!


Edited by tdtz (08/30/11 08:57 PM)

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#17983 - 08/31/11 06:12 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: tdtz]
Julie Offline


Registered: 03/31/11
Posts: 20
Loc: California
Thanks, I appreciate all the information.

Steve C. the information on the water sources is really helpful. This has convinced me to take 1 L of water, at least, up to Trail Camp or the switchbacks. Loved the photos of the the water sources, springs and creeks.

Tdtz -- baklava, fleece/leather gloves, windbreaker (my raincoat), poncho check!

Aichow -- thank you for the terrific weather websites. Sounds like Sunday, it will be 37 to 61 degrees at 10, 266 feet. Sunday, when we leave Portal, it will be sunny and 61, and at night, pc and 37. Labor Day (hopefully summit day) it will be Sunny and 61 degrees. Crossing my fingers it stays this way!!!

Versatile Fred. Thanks -- Sherpa likes your advice.

Gotta go. Sherpa has just figured out that 25% of 170 is not 45 pounds. He's telling me that I need to minimal pack. I just told him I'd carry the tent . . .

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#17984 - 08/31/11 06:33 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Julie]
Bob R Offline


Registered: 10/27/09
Posts: 129
Loc: Ridgecrest, California
Julie, I may see you. I just a few minutes ago agreed to accompany a friend up the Mountaineer's Route on Sunday. We're leaving early afternoon, and will camp somewhere along the way. Will summit probably mid- to late-morning on Monday. We are undecided whether to come down the main trail, or back down the MR.

I'm looking forward to this climb. I haven't been up in almost a week! (Pictures at Whitney August 27)

It will be my friend's 49th summit. He hopes for his 50th in three weeks when he turns 60. For me, well, I still keep track, but don't talk about the numbers much any more.

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#17985 - 08/31/11 07:05 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Bob R]
quillansculpture Offline


Registered: 11/13/09
Posts: 564
Loc: Murrieta, CA
You're funny Bob. Your numbers are impressive and your character is even more impressive. I always love your TR's and pics. It's more like a comforting story whenever I get a chance to read your adventures. I've never met you, but have actually been on the trail when someone said....."wow, I just saw Bob R at the permit office". So, you are not just known, but very well respected. And, I know how much you love the Sierras. I for one Love your numbers.
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#17986 - 08/31/11 07:12 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: quillansculpture]
Ken Offline


Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 742
Loc: Los Angeles
I'll be in Casa Vieja Meadow, cutting trees, Bob. That'll be me waving at you. smile

Julie, whatever you do, DO NOT WEAR A BAKLAVA! I speak from a very troubling experience. (however a balaklava may be very warming.

Quote:
Baklava (Ottoman Turkish: باقلوا) is a rich, sweet pastry made of layers of filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweetened with syrup or honey



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#17987 - 08/31/11 07:35 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Bob R]
Julie Offline


Registered: 03/31/11
Posts: 20
Loc: California
Bob R. I hope I can to meet you at the summit. "Old age and trickery will beat youth and inexperience every time." Maybe you can tell me some of your tricks? And the location of your secret camping spot? Your friend is amazing too -- 50 times up Whitney. Congratulations to both of you.

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#17988 - 08/31/11 09:21 PM Re: Advice needed on our first attempt to do Whitney [Re: Bob R]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7880
Loc: Fresno, CA
I too enjoyed seeing Bob R's pictures. This summit picture (#79) from his 2011-08-12 Mt. Whitney set is unique:

           
He lost a bet            



Julie wrote:
Bob R. I hope I can to meet you at the summit. "Old age and trickery will beat youth and inexperience every time."

Julie, were you referring to Bob R's Old Age and Trickery story?

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