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#19202 - 10/13/11 06:31 PM Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input?
quillansculpture Offline


Registered: 11/13/09
Posts: 552
Loc: Murrieta, CA
I was thinking. A lot of the people on the board, especially newbies don't know what to do as far as workouts to get ready for Whitney. What if we put a thread up titled "Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012" (or something like that,) and people can put down what they do every day, every week, etc, including workouts, what kind, times, hikes, etc.

People could put it up every day or once a week. I could go farther, such as how much you weigh (that would help some people as people will know where they are at and they will be held accountable.)

Example for me may be....

10/13/11
Gym:
1.5 hours stairclimber
.5 hours weights
195 lbs


You could follow one person or more, just by clicking on "users posts".

I got this idea because when I started to get in shape to hike Mt Whitney about 8 months before hip surgery in 2008, I was 255 lbs and couldn't walk 1/4 mile. Well, it's been three years, I'm down to 195 and can hike forever. I've summited Whitney 3 times and completed a marathon. I work out about 5 times a week and put in about 6 to 7 hours a week in cardio plus weights. I think it may be inspirational for people who want to know how to get ready for hiking Mt Whitney.

Anybody think this is a good idea?
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#19203 - 10/13/11 06:37 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 [Re: quillansculpture]
GandC Offline


Registered: 03/21/11
Posts: 246
Loc: SoCal
It's certainly not a bad idea, but mine is going to look awful mundane since I keep the same workout routine every single week. Barring sickness or weird work events, anyway.

Three days a week in the gym, about a half an hour with random free weights, and then an hour on the treadmill that works its way up to full incline for the first 15 minutes, full incline for half an hour, then works its way back down to minimum incline for a cool down. The other two days I ride my Cannondale on the PET bike trail through Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, and Fontana, a total of almost 30 miles.

I don't work out on weekends. That would go against everything I stand for. Weekends are for drinking, and for undoing all of the progress you made by working out every day of the week.
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One day I'd like to hike the entire John Muir Trail and not leave a single footprint. -Randy Morgenson

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#19204 - 10/13/11 06:45 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 [Re: GandC]
quillansculpture Offline


Registered: 11/13/09
Posts: 552
Loc: Murrieta, CA
Originally Posted By: GandC
Weekends are for drinking, and for undoing all of the progress you made by working out every day of the week.


When is Steve gonna add a "like" button :-)
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twitter: @josephquillan

If less is more, imagine how much more, more is -Frasier

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#19206 - 10/13/11 11:04 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 [Re: quillansculpture]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7235
Loc: Fresno, CA
like! like! like! like!

Type [...], replacing the ... between the [ and ] with "like".

Or click the smilie box above the posting window -- the first box with the face: . Then click the like button, and it will add the code into your message.

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#19211 - 10/14/11 03:39 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 [Re: Steve C]
tacklejunkie Offline


Registered: 10/05/11
Posts: 21
Loc: Ca
This thread is a good idea.
I would not advise doing Whitney without training.
I'm a fairly healthy and active guy and this mountain kicked
my newbie butt because I ignored my time to train on the local
Georgonio trails.


Do not ignore training for this mountain.
It is the real deal and you do need to train for it!
If you can't walk 21 miles on flat ground, chances are you can't walk the 21 mile round trip on Mt Whitney.

I think I made 14 of 21 miles.


Edited by tacklejunkie (10/14/11 03:45 AM)

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#19213 - 10/14/11 05:14 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 [Re: tacklejunkie]
Fishmonger Offline


Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 1025
Loc: Madison, WI
This summer I was invited to join a bike challenge and we were tracking our miles and workouts on this site

http://www.endomondo.com/

It's pretty cool in its basic concept, although a little too smart-phone centric for my liking. It allows you to track yours and your peers progress, helping to motivate you go to out there and do more.

Before this thing, I rarely rode my bike to work (36 mile round trip), but this year between August and October, I did more than 1000 miles using this challenge model. Now I bought some fenders for my bike to keep going until the wind chill gets down to the insane level around here.

Since Aug 1, i got these vital stats just for my work commutes

Total workouts: 55

Total duration: 3d:00h:02m

Total distance: 1689 km
Trips around the world: 0.042

Trips to the Moon: 0.004

Calories burned: 42902 kcal
Burgers burned: 79

I also saved about $300 in gas.


Might be worth setting up some sort of challenge or group for the Whitney prep, so folks aren't alone in their training efforts. Or you could join an existing challenge that matches your preferred workout type.
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#19215 - 10/14/11 06:45 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: quillansculpture]
Rboone Offline


Registered: 09/13/11
Posts: 15
Loc: Orange County, CA
Great idea!

42 years old, 6'1", 170 lbs.

I CrossFit (www.crossfit.com) to stay in shape. This workout regimen has me in the best shape of my life. A friend and I hiked Whitney Monday Oct. 3 and I felt as good as I did when I did it at 20 years old, perhaps better. CrossFit is a total fitness approach that combines a lot of cardio (running and rowing) with a lot of weights and olympic lifts. You can do it at a CF gym or out of your garage.

For example yesterday's workout was:
1 mile warm up run

7 rounds for time of:
30 sit ups
20 push ups
10 chest to bar pull ups
5 burpees

The day before:
1 mile warm up run

3 rounds for time of:
Run 800 meters
30 Dumbell hang squat cleans
30 burpees

Very high intensity and a lot of variety. Works great for me. Before Whitney I also did some training hikes up Mt. Baldy and in thee Cleveland National Forest.

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#19216 - 10/14/11 07:06 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Rboone]
KevinR Offline


Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 579
Loc: Manchester, NH
While this BB is obviously focused on Mt Whitney, I wonder how many hikers here view Whitney as just another hike among many others they do each year, versus the primary reason they hike.

I'm in the first category, and while Whitney is a longer than many of the hikes I do each year, it's not my "raison d'Ítre".

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#19218 - 10/14/11 07:18 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: KevinR]
Harvey Lankford Offline


Registered: 11/10/09
Posts: 989
Loc: Richmond, Virginia
all I ever do is walk up and down the 70 ft hill in front of my house. Typically ten laps 3 times a week. No pushups, no situps. no biking, no gawdawful gym stuff. Age 60. Just go and your pace at forget about the clock. Tortoise and the hare has worked for 4 times on Whitney and a bunch of others, dayhiking, backpacking, scrambling, etc,

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#19221 - 10/14/11 08:03 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Harvey Lankford]
tdtz Offline


Registered: 08/26/10
Posts: 511
Loc: CA
I have to admit, I don't do any of the big hikes in the local mountains for training. Never done Baldy, Gorgonio...whatever. I try to get one two mile hike in every week. And I run around the ball field two times, twice a week with the kids I am coaching. But other than that, I am with Harvey on the tortoise strategy.

On my last hike up to Meysan Lake I was really sucking wind. I was thinking that even my tortoise strategy wasn't working. After this little story, y'all are gonna think I am nuts. But it's more of a really crazy schedule lately and I simply forgot some things. Went in and had a physical a couple of weeks ago, something I do every 10 years or so. I was shocked to find out that I was pretty severly anemic. The shock comes from the fact that I give blood frequently and have never shown that I was anemic. And then it occured to me, the last time I gave blood was August 2nd and I did a double red cell apheresis. Red Cross and my doctor both said that two months was definitely enough for my hemoglobin and hematicrit to get back to normal. But then it occured to me....I gave blood on August 2nd and I started my hike to Meysan Lake on August 5th......DOH!!! I think there is a pretty good chance that my double red cell donation affected my hike.

And for the past two weeks I have been eating iron filings to offset the anemia. And I definitely feel a difference in what it takes to get winded. So now I am wondering how long I have had a slow leak (or whatever) and if the red cross tests are inadequate. Guess I'll find out, I get to make the exciting trip to the GI Doctor next week to see if I have a slow leak somewhere in the belly.

Anyway, my training is nominal at this point, I just go slow. And I'll continue to do Whitney once a year, but my long term goal is to go up all of the major drainages in the eastern sierra (along with the JMT in 2013).

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#19222 - 10/14/11 08:04 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: quillansculpture]
Bulldog34 Offline


Registered: 11/12/09
Posts: 1254
Loc: Atlanta
Hike, hike, hike. I always figured the best training for hiking uphill with a pack was, well . . . hiking uphill with a pack. Call me crazy.

I'm fortunate in that I have a decently rugged mountain about 15 minutes from home (Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park), and my wife and I try to hit it twice a week. Sometimes catpappy joins in, but since he's been recovering from a severe ankle sprain in July, not so much lately. Our typical workout is a 6-mile OAB route with 15-pound packs, getting about 1800 feet of gain. We mostly keep it under two hours, but occassionally it's over. Prior to our Sierra trip this past summer, we were hitting it in 1:35 with 15-pound packs and still less than 2 hours with 30-pound packs.

I'm 54 and my wife is 45, so this twice-a-week regimen works pretty well for us. About 8-weeks prior to our annual summer Sierra trip, we kick the pack weight up to the low thirties and try to hit it 3 times a week. I've been tracking the details of my hikes for about 5 years now (distance, elevation gain, time), and I've found that those years when I can get at least 200 miles and 50,000 feet of gain in, Whitney (and other peaks) come pretty easily. Before heading for the Sierra this past July, I had already logged 280 miles and 65,000 feet of gain for the year, and I felt pretty fresh on both Whitney and Mt. Dana, and so did my wife.

I've gotten more into technical rock climbing this year, so I also do some upper body and core work for that, in addition to the occassional trip to the climbing gym, but I'm a firm believer that if you want to hike up big mountains successfully, the primary thing to focus on in training is simulating that activity as much as possible.

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#19225 - 10/14/11 08:46 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Bulldog34]
quillansculpture Offline


Registered: 11/13/09
Posts: 552
Loc: Murrieta, CA
Good so far, but I guess I'm looking for people to put down schedules, what they do, times, etc. Weight is good. It just helps with motivation.
I'm hoping Steve could just set up a separate thread for this and people click on every day or every week to put their training in.
Also, I'm looking for honesty...... no "cheating" here, or there is no point to it. tdtz is way too honest and I'm embarrassed I haven't gotten together with him or Rod to get up Baldy.

I did the workout yesterday that I put up earlier in the thread. I only got three hours sleep last night, but I'll go to the gym and or/hike the hills today ad put down what I did. And oh yea, what's keeping me alert (or awake as I work)?..... dark chocolate covered coffee beans :-)
_________________________
"Turtles, Frogs & other Environmental Sculpture"

www.quillansculpturegallery.com
twitter: @josephquillan

If less is more, imagine how much more, more is -Frasier

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#19231 - 10/14/11 11:20 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: quillansculpture]
tdtz Offline


Registered: 08/26/10
Posts: 511
Loc: CA
Joe,
my best times are during the week. My work hours are very flexible, but my coaching hours are not. If you can do midweek stuff...I'm there.
Tom

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#19233 - 10/14/11 12:51 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: quillansculpture]
Eugene K Offline


Registered: 08/15/11
Posts: 40
Loc: San Diego, CA
In my opinion, the best way to train for the mountains is the mountains.

Don't get me wrong, cardio is a great idea for many other reasons, and it DOES help to get up Whitney. But there are things that cardio won't prepare you for, which will drain your energy just as easily. Like carrying a backpack, or handling temperature changes, or sleeping on the hard ground in a sleeping bag. The mode of energy expenditure when hiking uphill at 12000' is not quite the same as running on a treadmill or climbing a stairmaster.

I wish I had the wherewithal to do 6 hours/week of cardio in the gym like you guys. I just don't. I consider it a personal achievement if I can manage two hours a week. But I've been on four 12-hour hikes above 10,000' since July. Last time I made it to the cables and back in one day. It seems easier every time.

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#19235 - 10/14/11 01:41 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Eugene K]
quillansculpture Offline


Registered: 11/13/09
Posts: 552
Loc: Murrieta, CA
I agree with Eugene. Getting above 10,000 is the key. I did that this Summer every other weekend for about 6 weeks and that was after I summited Whitney in July. I was hoping to be in some good shape for the MR, but snow decided to change my plans.

and BTW.... I am getting GREAT PM's from people who train hard every day and summit 14er's as well as others who train very, very little and summit 14er's. Great stuff. Just goes to show everybody is different.

10/14
run/hike 6 miles
stairclimber 1 hour
weights 30 minutes


Edited by quillansculpture (10/14/11 05:56 PM)
_________________________
"Turtles, Frogs & other Environmental Sculpture"

www.quillansculpturegallery.com
twitter: @josephquillan

If less is more, imagine how much more, more is -Frasier

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#19254 - 10/16/11 09:49 AM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Bulldog34]
2600fromatari Offline


Registered: 10/18/10
Posts: 452
Loc: San Diego
I agree with Bulldog here. I've trained by biking and felt my quads burn so much more than hiking, but when it was time to throw on a pack and hit the Sierra or anywhere else for an extended period of time, I lose my mojo much faster than when I trained by going up local mountains, no matter how small they may be. I'm not a physical trainer or have a degree in human health, but I assume the bike can never prepare you for the strain on your knees and ankles. You're also working different muscles. Even snow shoeing versus regular boots had different parts of my legs hurting.

My regimen is not fixed, and I basically do what I feel like on any given day. It usually involves 5 hikes a week at one of the local mountains. They'll be 3-12 mile hikes with approximately 800-3,900 ft of gain. At least one of those hikes will be with a pack; 25-100 lbs depending on the length and elevation gain of the hike.

At least once a month, I'll go out to something bigger in the San Gorgonio, Jacinto, or Baldy area. I try to do a loop like Marion, Jean, San Jacinto or San Jacinto to Cornell. Mix and match them so I won't get bored doing the same trail over and over again.

No weights, just pullups. I throw in a bike ride every now and then. 2-3 miles before or after a hike, or I do about 12 miles as a stand alone.

I would be more healthy, but I eat junk food like there's no tomorrow. Carne asada burritos and Wiener Schnitzel chili cheese fries all day...and yes, I have high blood pressure and cholesterol but I don't care, they taste too damn good! I'll never be Ueli Steck, and out there to enjoy the wilderness and excitement of the mild scrambles and Class 3 stuff (and rarely a touch of 4), and the incomparable views. The training is enough to get me up and back safely, but I do get passed like I was standing still by quite a few (alright a lot) of folks up there.

I think anyone who does what I do can get up Whitney and back as a dayhike with a smile on his or her face. The key for me is to vary your trails and work out (hike 3 miles, jog 2 or hike 6 with a pack, or hike 3 with a pack then bike). Do something different so your muscles don't get used to one routine, and more importantly, so you won't get bored.

I've never stepped into a gym and never will.


Originally Posted By: Bulldog34
Hike, hike, hike. I always figured the best training for hiking uphill with a pack was, well . . . hiking uphill with a pack. Call me crazy.

I'm fortunate in that I have a decently rugged mountain about 15 minutes from home (Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park), and my wife and I try to hit it twice a week. Sometimes catpappy joins in, but since he's been recovering from a severe ankle sprain in July, not so much lately. Our typical workout is a 6-mile OAB route with 15-pound packs, getting about 1800 feet of gain. We mostly keep it under two hours, but occassionally it's over. Prior to our Sierra trip this past summer, we were hitting it in 1:35 with 15-pound packs and still less than 2 hours with 30-pound packs.

I'm 54 and my wife is 45, so this twice-a-week regimen works pretty well for us. About 8-weeks prior to our annual summer Sierra trip, we kick the pack weight up to the low thirties and try to hit it 3 times a week. I've been tracking the details of my hikes for about 5 years now (distance, elevation gain, time), and I've found that those years when I can get at least 200 miles and 50,000 feet of gain in, Whitney (and other peaks) come pretty easily. Before heading for the Sierra this past July, I had already logged 280 miles and 65,000 feet of gain for the year, and I felt pretty fresh on both Whitney and Mt. Dana, and so did my wife.

I've gotten more into technical rock climbing this year, so I also do some upper body and core work for that, in addition to the occassional trip to the climbing gym, but I'm a firm believer that if you want to hike up big mountains successfully, the primary thing to focus on in training is simulating that activity as much as possible.


Edited by 2600fromatari (10/16/11 11:44 AM)

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#19261 - 10/16/11 02:46 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Eugene K]
Bee Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1261
Loc: Northern California
Originally Posted By: Eugene K


I wish I had the wherewithal to do 6 hours/week of cardio in the gym like you guys. I just don't. I consider it a personal achievement if I can manage two hours a week. But I've been on four 12-hour hikes above 10,000' since July. Last time I made it to the cables and back in one day. It seems easier every time.


Hey Eugene,

No worries about not going to the gym; the last time I was there was in 2009, but I got thrown out during a racial encounter, so I was invited to not return (to some, I look Mexican...and to others, that aint so great)

Instead of all those leg presses and upper body reps (yawn) I do lunges on my way to the garage (double dips) and push-ups whilst my hair is drying. 15min or less at a time, and you will kick any gym rat's worked out arse!

Instead of driving to the coffee shop, I run (2 mi 4X a week), and when I have less time....I run harder.

Pull ups off the door jam (or my buddy's truck rack) covers the rest of the upper body.

Last year, I overnighted Whitney (with a 2 mile head start the afternoon before the "official hike", to actually make 2 overnights) No problem whatsoever, although I will emphasize that I was not setting any speed records (I will say that I hate downhills)

Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention that I had one hike previous all season.

The real key to my success? Generous acclimatization.

It is my personal opinion (which means it may not be for everyone) that special workouts for Whitney are highly overblown -- just keep moving.
_________________________
The body betrays and the weather conspires, hopefully, not on the same day.

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#19262 - 10/16/11 04:49 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Bee]
Harvey Lankford Offline


Registered: 11/10/09
Posts: 989
Loc: Richmond, Virginia
Originally Posted By: Bee
It is my personal opinion (which means it may not be for everyone) that special workouts for Whitney are highly overblown -- just keep moving.

Bee, I concur. Here is an example. Comparison of me on Onion Valley to Kearsarge Pass on 2 occasions during same vacation. First time, turned north to Rae Lakes for 4 days. Then went back down for a day. Second time Onion Valley to Kearsarge Pass and turned south to Whitney. That second time with same load, same weather took 3.5 hrs instead of 4.5. Why was there so much difference time-wise and ease-wise? Acclimatization. If it had been solely a fitness improvement, it would have taken weeks and weeks of pre-hike training to accomplish that. ( of course if you live at height, then....)

This is not to say training is unimportant. Some moderate level of fitness is desireable.

I will conclude with my usual flair for mountaineering quotes with the comment that this is from extreme altitude:
He abided by the Diemburger theory which maintains that slow, no matter how slow, but constant movement is the best way to achieve progress at altitude.
Joe Tasker, Everest the Cruel Way page 84

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#19264 - 10/16/11 05:11 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: Harvey Lankford]
Ken Offline


Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 742
Loc: Los Angeles
Althought not addressing the specifics of Q's post, I also agree that the specifics of training are unimportant. I think that lower body aerobics are the ticket, but you do what you have available.

BobR has continually impressed me with his experience with people who have not trained. It requires patience.

Optimal is hiking with weight, both uphill and downhill, for sustained distances. That is the best for the specific muscles and body parts.

Any aerobic activity works for the lung part.

When it comes time for the actual performance, optimally, one goes at a less intense level than the practice, with much in reserve, in case of problems.

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#19266 - 10/16/11 06:18 PM Re: Getting in Shape, Training for Whitney 2012 - Ideas, input? [Re: 2600fromatari]
KevinR Offline


Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 579
Loc: Manchester, NH
Originally Posted By: 2600fromatari
...I assume the bike can never prepare you for the strain on your knees and ankles. You're also working different muscles.


I would agree with you on this. What I've found, however, is the reverse is true for me - lots of hiking prepares my muscles for long distance multi-day bike rides, like a RAGBRAI. Hiking doesn't condition my butt, however, so bike saddle time is needed for that at the very least. But, my legs and lungs doesn't need conditioning after lots of hiking.

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