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#24672 - 06/04/12 04:27 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7739
Loc: Fresno, CA
> I cut my hand on the fall, and the blood had me worried because both rangers had warned of recent lion spottings.

The Mt Whitney area doesn't have the mountain lion issue. So hiking alone is probably much safer, in that respect. A hiker who is bleeding and injured in mountain lion territory is in much greater danger being alone than if accompanied by another hiker.

You can hike alone on the Mt Whitney trail, and not need to worry about mountain lions. ...but watch out for those killer grouse! grin

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#24677 - 06/04/12 08:11 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
Think of Mt. Whitney as the Mt. Baldy Ski Hut Trail of the Sierra. You will not want for company. I would not worry a bit about going by myself, especially on the way up when everyone is bunched together. The descent is a more dispersed.

I go solo all the time. I have made a bunch of rules for myself. I let loved ones know where I'm going and I do not deviate from my plan...even if something cool to do presents itself. You have to feel comfortable out by yourself.

You have got to pick your hiking partners wisely. If you are not compatible with them they do you no good. I only go out with people I can trust on serious trips. This is a serious trip for you. If you can't trust your partner to wait for you at intervals, you have a problem. Generally, when I'm out will someone who is slow I will wait at various spots because I do not want them to get too far behind. All this has to be established to your satisfaction before you head up the trail.

As for training reliable training partners...hook up with a meetup group or six. Between Mt. San Jacinto, SoCal Peakbaggers and OC Hiking Club, you should be able to put together a very good schedule over the next couple of months.

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#24679 - 06/04/12 08:35 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
Re White Mountain:

Apparently they are not doing an open house this year until September: http://www.wmrs.edu/community/open%20house/default.htm.

This has implications for the dirt road leading to Barcroft Gate. The lab used to do some work on the dirt road before each August open house, but I don't know what their plans are this year since there is no open house. So, if you do not have a high-clearance vehicle, you may want to call the White Mountain lab,and find out what the condition of the road is. (For reference, when we went up for the open house in 2010, we used a Volvo station wagon, and we were fine, though drove slowly.)

By the way, it was sleeping at the Barcroft Gate (elevation 11,700') the night before the hike that I discovered I need a small dose of Diamox at high altitude. Turns out I have altitude-related sleep apnea (also known as periodic breathing or Cheyne-Stokes) above 11,000 feet -- something I had never experienced at 10,000 feet. However, I gather this is not uncommon. Since I was carrying Diamox (although I had not planned to take any), I was able to solve the problem with a small dose on the spot, as periodic breathing is one of the altitude-related issues that Diamox can help address. I mention this as you may want to talk to your MD about obtaining Diamox, as Steve mentioned earlier.

Re going solo up Whitney:

I know you are getting a lot of advice to go solo. Recognizing that reasonable minds can differ on this issue too, I, personally, would not recommend to a newbie to high altitude to do Whitney solo as a first timer. A lot of folks on this board have done Whitney a number of times and/or have a lot of high altitude experience, and I think that may affect perspective. Two years out from my first high altitude experiences, on White and Whitney in 2010, the combination of fear and excitement is still fresh for me. I did exactly what you are doing (researched the mountain and asked lots of questions), and summiting Whitney (which capped off a 1.5 year weight loss effort) was one of the peak experiences of my life (pun intended!). Really fabulous. (And I did go with friends, all newbies like me.) I do recognize that people have different sensitivities to risk taking.

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#24711 - 06/05/12 12:49 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Akichow]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Good to know about the dirt road. I have a Volvo station wagon as well. Either way, I would be doing White Mountain prior to the road being groomed.

I figure that most of the "old-timers" have no problem with solo summitting Whitney. I'm not a very experienced hiker, and don't have the high altitude experience. I'm not so much risk-adverse, but rather risk-mitigation oriented. If I cannot sufficiently mitigate my risk, I won't do it. smile

I have an appointment scheduled with my neurologist to discuss Diamox and altitude in general, I have regular apnea. (Apnea is one of the reasons I prefer a day hike.)


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#24720 - 06/05/12 02:13 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
Sounds like you are getting your ducks all lined up!

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#24736 - 06/05/12 06:24 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Bulldog34 Offline


Registered: 11/12/09
Posts: 1255
Loc: Atlanta
Gelsomina, first let me say that you're getting good advice, varied as it may be. I personally know and/or have hiked with many of the members who've posted on this thread. They're each and every one good, sincere people who (1) are giving you their honest perspective and (2) would always stop to assist a hiker in distress (wazzu's got a helluva story about her first attempt at Whitney). The key here is taking the advice that's right for you. I believe your post has generated more than the typical response for a first-timer's questions because you've been utterly honest about your experience level and are genuinely seeking advice, and it's evident you have a well-thought-out plan. Many first-timers don't, nor do they listen to advice from people who have been in their shoes if it runs counter to their mindset.

Unless you have absolute certainty in your partner's dedication to you, treat this mentally as a solo hike. If that creates anxiety, the upside is there's really no such thing as a solo hike on Whitney in summer due to the crowds. The downside is that you have to mentally and emotionally be prepared to mostly do it on your own. As I said before, if you stick with that training plan you'll have the legs to climb Whitney. That leaves altitude sickness and injury as your most likely potential issues. There will be virtually no snow or ice on the mountain come August - the primary cause of most injuries - so you really need to focus on beating the potential of AMS, as you've not been above 10K' before (or I assumed so from your initial post, which is the reason I suggested Diamox). AMS aside, all this hike is in August is a very long, very tiring walk on a well-defined trail. You're not climbing the Matterhorn, so don't psych yourself out before you begin (it happens).

Acclimation is the best deterrent to altitude sickness. Two nights at 10,000 feet (Horseshoe Meadows) is the recommended dose before tackling this mountain. Once your body is acclimated to sleeping at X altitude (at or above 10K'), the prevailing wisdom is you're good for another 2000 feet the following day. The problem for a dayhiker is that 4500 feet are waiting for you - hence the many flame-outs at Trail Camp (12,000 feet) or on the switchbacks above Trail Camp.

I was one of those AMS flame-outs my first time up Whitney, and I was solo. I had myself (erroneously) convinced that I was one of the lucky few to have no predisposition to AMS, so I didn't take much precaution. I had been above 14K' a number of times with no ill effects, and once even went from sea level to 14K' in less than 12 hours, problem-free. Why acclimate for Whitney? That's one of the nefarious things about AMS - it's unpredictable. Sherpas in the Himalaya who've been running up and down 8000-meter peaks their entire lives have been known to die of altitude-induced edema at 6000 meters or so.

Anyway, trust me when I tell you that making my way down from 13,500 feet on Whitney with raging AMS, by myself, was the hardest thing I've ever had to will myself to do. Worst headache ever, incessant nausea, kaliedoscope dizziness, DT-shakiness - but the worst symptom to overcome was the most incredibly lethargic feeling. I just wanted to lay down and go to sleep - screw everything else. Of course, I'm a guy, so I lied every time someone would ask me if I was OK or needed assistance. Gotta perpetuate the rugged, independent male stereotype, right? Actually, I just couldn't believe I had AMS and was mentally trying to write it off to food poisoning or some other malady outside my control.

Needless to say, proper acclimation became Job One every trip to altitude after that. I never, ever want to feel that way again. I've had no problems since, and have only used Diamox on one occasion, that being taking my wife and 11 YO daughter up Whitney last year for their first time (I was taking no chances with my girls, so we were a Diamox piss-happy family that trip). Diamox isn't a magic bullet - you can still develop AMS with it in your system - but it helps aid the acclimation process and can often provide that extra oomph many people need to ambulate reasonably well above 12K'.

White is relatively easy on the legs compared to Whitney, so if you go that route it should tell you whether Diamox is in your future. Just be sure to do the other things properly - acclimate, hydrate, eat and pace - and you'll reduce the chances of AMS to an absolute minimum. If you have an inkling you might be on your own on the mountain at some point, these are your priorities. Diamox is an option, but often the right one for many people. My wife historically couldn't go above 12K' without some serious AMS setting in, regardless of acclimation, but Diamox has given her that edge she needed.

Best of luck and be sure to let us know how it goes!

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#24738 - 06/05/12 06:44 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Bulldog34]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
Damn Bulldog, your big time AMS episode was worst than mine. I guess the only advantage you had was you descent was all downhill. Mine on the other hand, started at the top of White Mountain. Needless to say, those to climbs on the way back about killed me.

I've had AMS three times over 14,000'. First time at Mt. Whitney was just the alien trying to crawl out of the right eye coupled with a subpar fitness level. I know the headache went away somewhere during the descent. The second time was Mt. Whitney two years later. It could feel it coming on at the summit but it was gonzo at Trail Crest. My one big time AMS was on White in 2000, headache, nausea, lack of appetite and malaise. This did not go away until I was back in Big Pine (4,000') for a few hours...and this after two days of acclimatization.

After that, I figured it was give up the Sierra or get Diamox, which works most of the time. My biggest problems these day are lack of appetite over 12,000', if I push too hard...it's not unusual for me to go nitey-nite without dinner, and sleep deprivation, usually over about 11,500'.

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#24742 - 06/05/12 07:13 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: wbtravis]
Bulldog34 Offline


Registered: 11/12/09
Posts: 1255
Loc: Atlanta
It's funny, Bill - before attempting Whitney the first time in '09, I downloaded and printed all the detail from your website (that and Fred's orientation notes here are, I think, the two best information sources for a Whitney first-timer). Of course, I glossed over all the precautionary AMS stuff. I don't get AMS, so why worry . . .?

That day I was dying at Trail Camp . . . and felt almost fully recovered by Outpost Camp (3-plus hours later - without AMS it takes me maybe 30 minutes). Apparently not though - I walked into the Portal Store, grabbed a beer and went to the counter to pay. Doug took one look at me and said, "That one's on the house."

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#24749 - 06/05/12 08:45 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Bulldog34]
2600fromatari Offline


Registered: 10/18/10
Posts: 453
Loc: San Diego
Gelsomina, I couldn't agree more with Bulldog's post. I was up there last week and got a bad case of altitude sickness. My first time at Whitney was the worst and I promised never to let it happen again. Unfortunately, what I promised and want, and reality don't exactly go hand-in-hand. His description is perfect. All you want to do is lay down and go to sleep. It's like having the worst hangover while you're still drunk.

The last time two time I went up there, it was PERFECT. I felt like a million bucks. Went last week, acclimated well for two full days and night. I felt fine going up the chute until around 13k ft, and then bam, it hit me like a brick wall. I was debating risking going up the final 400 or not. It took me longer walking down the main trail than going up the MR.

Good luck.


Edited by 2600fromatari (06/05/12 09:21 PM)

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#24764 - 06/06/12 08:03 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: 2600fromatari]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
Gelsomina,

After reading all this I'm sure you are confused. What you are getting is everyone's experience with higher elevation. Everyone's experience with this is different; therefore, it is difficult to recommend a course of action to you.

In SoCal, if you day hike to San Gorgonio via Vivan Creek or South Fork you are over 10,000' a short period of time. The elevation sensitive will be dying. However, many who will have problems in the Sierra will not have problems here. Time wise Vivian Creek is similar to White Mtn...and White Mtn. killed me even after two days at elevation.

Just like there are no two cases of AMS alike, there are many ways to dose Diamox. It took me 3 or 4 years to get it right for me. The current standard dosing procedure did not work at all. Then, there are the side effects.

If you have problems with sulfa drug, you most likely will have problems with Diamox. If you dose level is too high you will have a lot of tingling in the extremites. Forget about any carbonate beverage...they will taste horrible for about 24 hours after your last dose...I've had issues out to 72 hours.



Edited by wbtravis (06/06/12 09:47 AM)

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#24768 - 06/06/12 09:04 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: wbtravis]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7739
Loc: Fresno, CA
> If you have problems with sulfa drug, you most likely will have problems with Diamox.

Looking for the link... Doctor Ken on this site reports that Diamox (acetazolamide) does not have the sulfa formulation that leads to the sensitivity.

Edit: here's the link:  High Altitude Sickness

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#24770 - 06/06/12 09:46 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Steve C]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
I stand corrected. I plead guilty what I have read on the dreaded internet.

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#24773 - 06/06/12 11:11 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Steve C]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
An anecdotal, nonscientific, postscript, on this oft-recurring theme: I am allergic to sulfa-containing antiobotics, and I have no problems with Diamox. However, on my Kili trip, there was a woman who was allergic to sulfa who had some sort of allergic reaction to Diamox and could not take it. (Like the previous poster, I have experimented with dosage, and take far less than the "recommended" dosage.)

So, back to the original topic: go climb Whitney! Have fun! Be safe!

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#24775 - 06/06/12 12:26 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Bulldog34]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Originally Posted By: Bulldog34
...you have a well-thought-out plan. Many first-timers don't, nor do they listen to advice from people who have been in their shoes if it runs counter to their mindset.

... the upside is there's really no such thing as a solo hike on Whitney in summer due to the crowds. The downside is that you have to mentally and emotionally be prepared to mostly do it on your own... ... so you really need to focus on beating the potential of AMS... ...don't psych yourself out before you begin (it happens).

Acclimation is the best deterrent to altitude sickness... ...The problem for a dayhiker is that 4500 feet are waiting for you...

I had myself (erroneously) convinced that I was one of the lucky few to have no predisposition to AMS... - it's unpredictable. Sherpas in the Himalaya who've been running up and down 8000-meter peaks their entire lives have been known to die of altitude-induced edema at 6000 meters or so.

Anyway, trust me when I tell you that making my way down from 13,500 feet on Whitney with raging AMS, by myself, was the hardest thing I've ever had to will myself to do. Worst headache ever, incessant nausea, kaliedoscope dizziness, DT-shakiness - but the worst symptom to overcome was the most incredibly lethargic feeling. I just wanted to lay down and go to sleep - screw everything else. Of course, I'm a guy, so I lied every time someone would ask me if I was OK or needed assistance. Gotta perpetuate the rugged, independent male stereotype, right? Actually, I just couldn't believe I had AMS and was mentally trying to write it off to food poisoning or some other malady outside my control.

...proper acclimation became Job One every trip to altitude after that. I never, ever want to feel that way again...


Nope, you guys aren't confusing me! I recognize everyone has slightly different experience/advice, but that's a good thing.

Bulldog (and everybody), thank you for your honest detailed account of AMS and all experiences. I REALLY need to hear this kind of thing, and for a less experienced person it does not "go without saying" blush . It does do 2 things:
(1) knowing ahead of time what to expect (how it feels, what it makes you think-feel-do) enables me to stay calm/collected and better handle the situation.
(2) re-focuses me on strategies for better mitigating risks like AMS, focus on what is important. I need to be VIGILANT about acclimation, hydration, pace, even nutrition.

Before you guys told me all this, I would have NEVER asked a non-partner on the trail for assistance or company unless I was in dire straits. Now if I need to head back down on my own, I will say hello and ask them if I can hike down with them because I'm having (x) problem or want some company. I still might not ask them if they look like they're hiking at high speed, but I'd eventually ask somebody who is at a pace I can maintain.

The other thing that is a big help is to not psych myself out! I tend to get anxious beforehand for major unexperienced events, so I reach out to people like you all, get advice, take advice, prepare, then when I actually execute I'm as prepared as I personally can be and have fun instead of being worried. I think it's really important to be able to get advice from people to change my mindset; I'd much rather do that than learn the hard way by proving myself both wrong and stubborn.

So this is where I am right now:
- train to my plan
- consider substituting White Mountain, especially if I do not get my 7/14 Vivian-Gorgonio permit or just substitute it for overly popular HumberPark-SJPeak
- reconsider my acclimation plan (stay at Horseshoe meadow instead of tagging along with Original Partner doing photography at lower elevations)
- discuss/get Diamox from doc, 62.5 mg to 125 mg twice/day 2 days prior
- come up with vigilant concrete plan for hydration, pace, nutrition, ectrolyte pills
- prepare my pack as if solo hiking (e.g., 10 essentials, map mountain water sources, don't overpack)
- prepare my mind as if solo hiking
- ask to tag along with other hikers on trail if left alone by my group
- FOCUS...Forget Others Concentrate Upon Self
- Be a tortoise, not a hare (don't have to keep up with the marathon men, and going slower will actually HELP me with AMS)
- recognize and deal with AMS
- deal with group dynamics ahead of time
- discuss/plan on-trail communication and etiquette ahead of time (e.g., I have a tendency to run ahead when I get excited, need to learn to not do that; leave pack on trail if off-trail, etc.)
- keep looking online for permit availability for NP (I have a New Partner, Old Partner is good with him going, NP enthusiastically committed to all training hikes and "got your back" philosophy, is willing to take the chance of getting day-before walk-in permit)


..... Humbly asking you guys for suggestions on one more topic: nutrition.

REI Whitney Guy suggested I use Hammer Perpetuem for on-trail nutrion. I have used Hammer products before for trail running, I like them, they're better quality. What do you think of that? I prefer whole unprocessed foods, but I want to keep the nutrition simple. What do you all use for nutrition?


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#24776 - 06/06/12 12:50 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
tdtz Offline


Registered: 08/26/10
Posts: 511
Loc: CA
..... Humbly asking you guys for suggestions on one more topic: nutrition.

REI Whitney Guy suggested I use Hammer Perpetuem for on-trail nutrion. I have used Hammer products before for trail running, I like them, they're better quality. What do you think of that? I prefer whole unprocessed foods, but I want to keep the nutrition simple. What do you all use for nutrition?


simply rule about food at altitude. Make sure that it is something that you like. Don't get adventurous and try funky new protein bars or goo or whatever unless you absolutely know that you like them. I found that food that is ok and tolerable at sea level is absolutely unpalatable above 12000'. I recommend moist foods.

Also, for gatorade or other sports drinks, I found that the regular concentration gets my mouth and throat too mucus-y. I generally go with half concentration and even then I will wash it down with clean water.

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#24779 - 06/06/12 04:07 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: tdtz]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Oh yes, I can attest to that myself with trail running... never again will I try new things during an event. Lesson learned the hard way is now unforgettable. :sick:

If I do use Hammer Perpetuem, I'll use it multiple times prior to Whitney on a training hike or trail run. My trainer is big on me getting correct fat/protein/carb mix for the sport, but want to know what old-timers find works and doesn't work in the real world.

I don't use Gatorade, it's chemical-ish to me (I can stomach it, just don't like it). I get my electrolytes through Nuun, or Hammer product/pill (they're all dry as well, so can be mixed on trail.)

I think I should bring things that don't have much packaging (man-made or natural) so I don't have to carry excess garbage weight.

What moist foods do you bring?


Edited by Gelsomina (06/06/12 04:08 PM)

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#24780 - 06/06/12 04:37 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
Hello. Your list is really impressive.

On Diamox, FYI, through self-experimentation, I am now down to 62.5 mg once a day, just before sleeping at altitude. I no longer start with Diamox the day before going to altitude, though I do start drinking more water a day or so before going to altitude. Gender and weight may influence dosage (I am female). If/when I go above a sleeping altitude of 13,000', I increase it. Your experience may differ.

I don't use Gatorade. I do, however, use serious electrolytes (particularly important if you are peeing a lot). I use (1) Nuun for normal hiking days, supplemented with (2) Cytomax on summit days. I also have found Clif Shots to be helpful on the 97 switchbacks. That's me; your experience may differ. smile You should probably avoid caffeine because it is a diuretic ... you will need to check energy drinks, bars, etc., to see if they contain caffeine.

I haven't had problems with appetite at altitude yet, but I do build in a lot of acclimatization. Generally, they say that simple carbs are easier to digest and don't compete for resources needed for the climb. But I, personally, have craved protein on every summit ... there is probably a lot of idiosyncrasy there. All I could think of, while hanging out on my first Whitney Summit, was a roast turkey and stuffing and all, I mean, all, the fixings. Yes, I realize that is weird. But I settled for salami and cheese and whole wheat tortillas. And peanut butter, oh yeah, peanut butter.

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#24781 - 06/06/12 05:35 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Akichow]
Bee Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1261
Loc: Northern California
My background is what works for the military, works for me (they are the original "hikers")

Cashew nuts instead of -- gasp -- Cheetos if you want an instant boost of DIGESTIBLE fats energy. The Navy Seals practically live on them!

Dried fruit (if not sulfur processed) is excellent for longs slogs like the switchbacks, because it takes a long time to chew up AND it stimulates the saliva glands.

Salami or -- gag -- SPAM instead of Jerky for the reason of digestibility. Jerky is very hard to digest.

Peanut M&M's for emergency energy boost, as the sugar is quick for pick-me-up & the fat/protein of the peanuts acts as a backdrop.

Carbs+protein for breakfast/fats+carb for lunch/protein for Dinner.

I do not partake much in Gatorade et al, because I find that if I regularly hydrate and eat food every hour (nuts/fruit/salami/pumpkin bread) I have no need to artificially bost body chemicals. Everyone is different, and I am a lazy hiker, so perhaps I am not working hard enough to be losing salts (I am a desert person so I sweat very very light)

It does not surprise me that many folk crave protein on the summit, as protein is the best thing for muscle rejuvenation (if you can drink dairy, there is nothing more satisfying after a workout than Chocolate milk....unfortunately, I cannot take in ANY dairy frown
_________________________
The body betrays and the weather conspires, hopefully, not on the same day.

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#24783 - 06/06/12 08:42 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Bee]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
Gelsomina,

Mt. Whitney is nothing more than a 22-mile, +6,100' day hike. People have a tendency to over think it. It's just a a longer day hike going to a higher elevation than you normally do. It has only a few different requirements, none of them have to do with food and water...other than taking more than you usually take up the trail. I take a balanced approach protein, fat and both simple and complex carbohydrates because you are going to be on the trail upward to 18 hours...if things go as planned. Also, if you do not like the food you are taking at sea level, I can guarantee you, you will balk at it above 12,000'. I also plan to walk off the trail with between 1,000 and 2,000 calories in my pack.

As for hydration, I will take enough Cytomax powder for a couple of liters.

Everything is just a little more than I would take on a day hike in the local mountain of SoCal.

The only thing I am religious about is clothing. I will not go up the trail without enough clothing to make it through the night at 14,500', if something happens.

All this makes for a not so light pack...especially with 8 lbs of water for the Trail Camp round trip.

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#24786 - 06/06/12 09:24 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
VersatileFred Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 130
Loc: SoCal
Originally Posted By: Gelsomina

I did my first training hike yesterday (the 11.6mi tram to SJ Peak), it was totally fun, I still had plenty of energy left. I ran about the last 1/2 mile and could have kept going. My average pace was 24:17 min/mi (speed 2.47 mi/hour).

FYI, I was in a group of 17 people who also did that route on Saturday. Most of us went up on the first tram. We split up into two groups once we reached the ranger station. The faster group took just over 3 hours to reach the summit and just over two hours to get back. After an hour on the summit, we ran into the slower group about 15 minutes down (below the final fork).

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