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#24529 - 05/31/12 01:31 PM First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Hey all you old timers,

I'd love to hear your opinion on my training for Mount Whitney, the one-day Whitney Trail to the summit.

I live at sea level in San Diego, 47 year old female. Not that it's comparable, but I ski 8 hour days in Utah/Colorado at 10,000 elevation with no problem. I'm a runner, try to do at least half my runs as trail runs. Longest race I've done is a trail half marathon. I currently strength train with a trainer 2x/week, run 2-4x/week, swim 1-2x/week, conditioning hike 1x/week (fast-pace lactate threshold hike), couple social hikes monthly (~7 miles). We will drive up 2 days early and camp at 9,500 altitude and 6,700 altitude for Whitney.

I'm starting my Whitney training hikes this weekend. Here is a schedule of my training hikes.

Elev. base peak
Week Date, Miles Gain alt. alt location

Every Thursday 5.4 950 200, 1150 Cowles steepside conditioning
hike (lactate threshold)
1, Sat. June 2 11.6 2834 8000, 10834 Tram to San Jacinto Peak
2, Sun. June 10 Anza Borrego desert hike
3, Sat. June 16 14.6 3234 7600, 10834 Fuller Ridge to San Jacinto Peak
4, Sun. June 24 local San Diego peak
5, Sun. July 1 local Morgan Hill peak
6, Sat. July 7 16.0 4434, 6400, 10834 Humber to San Jacinto Peak
7, Sat. July 14 18.6 5422, 6080, 11502 Vivian to San Gorgonio Peak
8, Sun. July 22 20 Porcupine Mountains, Lake Superior, MI
9, Sat. July 28 15 Lake Superior hike
10,Sat. Aug. 4 taper?
11,Fri. Aug. 10 22 6500, 8000, 14500 Mount Whitney Peak

Weeks 1,3,6,7 are the primary hikes for length, elevation gain, altitude. Week 8 is length, will have to make do with elevation in midwest.

Of course I want to reach the summit, but I also want it to be fun and not a death march. Do you think I'm doing enough to prepare? Any suggestions

Thanks,
Gelsomina


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#24530 - 05/31/12 01:45 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
+ @ti2d Offline


Registered: 10/22/09
Posts: 836
Loc: Sheridan, OR
Looks like a great plan....

Aug 4...take a break...you might want to hit Jacinto and do a "leisure" hike...take your time up there...smell the pines....head up early then get down before the tourist amass up there.

Early Whitney start: your preference. I prefer 12:01 am...enough time to reach the summit and get back down in time for some froth and fries and gloating!
_________________________
Journey well...

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#24533 - 05/31/12 02:54 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
GandC Offline


Registered: 03/21/11
Posts: 252
Loc: SoCal
It's more than what I'm doing and have done in the past, that's for sure. I'm doing a few runs up Icehouse Canyon to Timber Mountain and Cucamonga Peak, a run up Baldy, and I think I'm going to throw in a run up Mt. Wilson from Chantry Flats this year, mostly because I've never done it before.

Last year I did pretty much the same, only more of it, and I felt great all the way up to Trail Camp twice. Once we unloaded our bags to soaking wet gear from big T-storms and had to turn back, and then there was an ordeal with AMS that brought me back on the second go around.

Hopefully I'll have better luck this year! Good luck to you too!
_________________________
One day I'd like to hike the entire John Muir Trail and not leave a single footprint. -Randy Morgenson

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#24540 - 05/31/12 04:01 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: GandC]
trail runner Offline


Registered: 06/30/10
Posts: 51
Loc: Florida
You will kill it, (as long as AMS doesn't get you). Your acclimatization plan is good, so that shouldn't be a problem. You are doing more than enough training hikes and your half marathon training will be very helpful. Good luck and keep your pack light...you will do fine.

Kent

PS I also live at sea level and didn't feel it was a big deal.

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#24544 - 05/31/12 05:21 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: trail runner]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
There are a few things that might get you. As mentioned, AMS and anything related to it, and no experience above 11,500'. Many start to wall out as they approach the Trailside Meadow/Consultation Lake area.

Those two can be remedied by replacing one of your hikes with a trip to White Mountain. White is an "easy" 14er...that is, if an alien isn't trying to crawl out of your right eye, you don't have an appetite or... It is 15-miles RT, ~+3,200'. The ascent through marmot valley to the observatory on the way back will get your attention.

Based on your stated fitness level, you should be ok if the AMS and inexperience at these elevations don't get'cha.

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#24551 - 05/31/12 06:47 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Bulldog34 Offline


Registered: 11/12/09
Posts: 1255
Loc: Atlanta
Gelsomina, if you complete that training plan you'll definitely have the legs for a Whitney dayhike. Unfortunately, as others have mentioned, it's the altitude that stops many dayhikers. That 12,000-foot level - roughly Trail Camp - presents a wall to a fairly high percentage of folks dayhiking the mountain. And conditioning has little to no bearing on your susceptibility to be hit by AMS - many a marathoner has flamed out on Whitney due to not appreciating what 70% of sea level oxygen can do to your body, aerobic beast or not.

Dayhikers are more likely to be hit with AMS than overnighters who get that extra night's acclimation at roughly 12,000 feet. If you can, I would suggest spending those two nights prior to Whitney at Horseshoe Meadows campground (10,000 feet). It's about a 45-minute drive south of the Portal. Suggestion number two would be get a scrip for Diamox from your doctor and go on it 48 hours prior to your dayhike. Not the recommended doasege (for glaucoma), but 62.5 mg to 125 mg twice a day. Between solid acclimation and having Diamox in your system, you'll have the best chance of warding off AMS and making this a memorable experience and not a death march.

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#24552 - 05/31/12 07:29 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
VersatileFred Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 130
Loc: SoCal
As stated in earlier posts, the altitude is the unknown factor. San Gorgonio is not as high up as Trail Camp so the effects of almost half of the trail will remain to be discovered. Your training plan looks good given what you know. Your break just before your hike does not help, but you still have alternate activities planned.

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#24555 - 05/31/12 10:35 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
Hello. Not quite on point, but you might find this trip report interesting -- 3 women, all in our 40s, successful (overnight) summit hike on our first summit attempt. We did no where near the training you did (one of our number did no hike-specific training, though she was generally in good shape), but then again, we were overnighting, which is a different type of experience from a day hike.

http://www.whitneyzone.com/wz/ubbthreads.php/topics/7138/First_Summit_Labor_Day_9_6_201#Post7138

The one thing I would add is, as you may surmise from the report, speed is not necessarily your friend when you are climbing to altitude. A slower pace may reduce your chances of suffering AMS (as will proper hydration as noted by others, perhaps together with judicious use of electrolyte supplements).

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#24560 - 06/01/12 08:24 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Akichow]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
Bulldog,

I use Diamox for all trips to the Sierra. I am not an advocate going to a doctor and get a prescription until you establish a need...and the only way to do that is going high.

Personally, I can day hike anywhere in SoCal without having problems. However, take me to the Sierra for an extended period...bam. Day hiking White or Whitney will do me in or a night at Horseshoe and sometimes WP.

There is the standard high elevation dosing recommendation but it does not work for everyone...it does not for me. Also, it is not 100% effective. I will have problems sleeping most of the time, sometimes aheadache the first night in and lost of appetite over 12,000', if I push too hard...all this being fully dosed for more days that recommended. That and feeling slightly funky until the stuff clears my system.

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#24585 - 06/01/12 04:33 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: wbtravis]
juroknow Offline


Registered: 06/01/12
Posts: 19
Loc: Tehachapi, Ca.
Sounds like a good plan. Goodluck.

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#24628 - 06/03/12 08:24 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Thanks everyone for your replies, they help a lot.

I would love to squeeze in White, but I don't think I can get somebody to take the time to do it with me with the 6 hour drive. (I'm skittish about going alone.)

It sounds like my training will be good enough, except for finding out about AMS. Although I take it you don't train for AMS, correct? You can acclimate, and train at higher altitudes though, correct? I will definitely talk to my doctor about getting the Diamox pills. I'm not much of a pill taker, but I'm more than willing to do so if it increases my chances of summitting.

I did my first training hike yesterday (the 11.6mi tram to SJ Peak), it was totally fun, I still had plenty of energy left. I ran about the last 1/2 mile and could have kept going. My average pace was 24:17 min/mi (spee 2.47 mi/hour). I do need to work on pacing myself, went a little too fast at first but I'm learning to pay attention to my breathing/heartrate and using those to slow me down. From what I understand, it is okay to be a turtle and not a hare.

I think 2 of the guys doing Whitney with me are concerned I'm going to be too slow. But one of them hiked with me yesterday, and he said at the end of the hike "well, I guess I'm going to have to let them know you kicked my ass up here." They are all marathon runners, I'm not. But just because I did better than he did yesterday (in terms of perceived exertion) isn't a predictor of how I will do on longer hikes. Therefore I am going to stick to my plan. I hope they join me on the future hikes. I worry if they don't do training hikes, but I'm a worrier. One is 48 years old, the others around 60 years old.

Another friend said that you shouldn't try to go fast, go slow and steady.

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#24642 - 06/04/12 07:23 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
wbtravis Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 1253
Loc: Corner of Jack Benny and Roche...
White Mountain is a road hike from start to finish. If there is any hike you can do by yourself this is the one.

You will not know about AMS until the alien starts crawling out of your right eye, you find the food you love the most is inedible, the thought of walking another step is a monumental task or you start yakking all over the landscape...and this all can happen in a relatively short period of time. About 40% of people are affected by AMS.

2.47-MPH is quick for most. I did about that last time I did Ontario Peak...up/down and a bite to eat. I'm considered slow amongst my hiking friends but when I'm out on my own I am rarely passed. You have recognized pace as the big deal it is. Find a speed you can go all day without starting and stopping. You do not want to bonk. Bonking on Mt. Whitney is no fun...I've done that bit of stupidity.

Hike your hike, don't worry about the hares you hike with and you will do just fine. I learned a long time ago I'm not a hare and I don't enjoy myself when I pretend to be one.

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#24645 - 06/04/12 07:56 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
+ @ti2d Offline


Registered: 10/22/09
Posts: 836
Loc: Sheridan, OR
Originally Posted By: Gelsomina
...it is okay to be a turtle and not a hare...I think 2 of the guys doing Whitney with me are concerned I'm going to be too slow...Another friend said that you shouldn't try to go fast, go slow and steady.


Actually it's a tortoise...turtles are water...tortoises are land... wink

FOCUS...Forget Others Concentrate Upon Self.

Go you own pace...it is not a race...it's an escape...and it is worth every step!
_________________________
Journey well...

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#24652 - 06/04/12 11:51 AM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: + @ti2d]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Yes definitely, I could feel it in my body that I needed to learn to slow down to pace myself. These training hikes aren't just to get my cardio/muscles/tendons/ligaments ready, it's to teach myself how to handle things. And to shake-down my equipment.

I'm a tortoise then, because it's probably slower than a turtle. laugh

You guys brought up something else I'm worried about.

"Hike your hike, don't worry about the hares you hike with and you will do just fine" and "Go you own pace...it is not a race"

I must admit I'm frightened to be left alone on the trail. Last year I was trail running on a remote local mountain trail by myself, two separate sets of rangers warned me that I should not be out there alone (one while getting directions, another on horseback entering the trail). I told them I was only going out and back 5 miles, they were still disapproving. It felt very foreshadowing, I should have listened to that weird feeling. I fell and hurt my ankle badly, and barely made it back to my car. Now I'm afraid to do that kind of stuff alone. I'm not experienced, so I don't know if I should be afraid or if I'm just being a baby.

I brought up to my hiking partner that I wanted to understand what the philosophy was going to be on the trail. He got irate with me, not sure if it's because I'm being a baby or if he felt I was making him feel bad. Essentially, found out on Saturday that if I cannot continue on the trail, he would leave me there. The only exception to this is if I got AMS, then he would help me back down. My philosophy is more of a "got your back no matter what" buddy system of hiking.

I'm not worried so much about me not physically being able to do the 22 miles based on physical fitness because I'm committed to training (I've always used disciplined training schedules), I'm more worried that I'll be left to make it back down to the Portal alone if I hurt my ankle or my hip or something. I sense he would be angry if me in that situation. I don't know what would be worse, him being angry and hiking back down with me, or being alone and hiking back down. He did say I could just hike down with other people we might run into. I told him I would be uncomfortable relying on help from strangers if I couldn't rely on it from a hiking partner.

So, I could really use your guys' advice on this, too. Am I being a big baby? Do lots of people hike Whitney and as hiking partners drop off and can't continue, then they go back down by to the Portal by themselves? What do people usually do prior to the big hike? Do they talk and agree ahead of time on what the strategy is if someone is not doing well for any reason other than AMS?

My hiking partner doesn't want to commit to training hikes, so should I maybe use my training hikes as a way to get over my fear of hiking by myself? Is it normal to be afraid to hike by myself? (I'm talking like 14+ mile hikes on San Jacinto and San Gorgonio)

Thanks a lot for your input you guys,
G

P.S. I like that FOCUS, I will add that to my mantras!!!

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#24655 - 06/04/12 01:05 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Steve C Offline


Registered: 09/22/09
Posts: 7880
Loc: Fresno, CA
Interesting and valuable questions and discussion....

I think you will find hikers and hiking partners with varying degrees of helpfulness. There are those who will hike with you only if you can keep up with them, and they won't wait at any trail junctions, or any other place. They just keep going on their own. I prefer not to include that type in any hike I organize or join.

(Reminds me of this: Hiked with a guy like that once. He left everyone and went ahead, both going in and out. Going out, he got off route; nobody called for him, just kept going. He made it out after the others, and was complaining. I was laughing inside. Will never hike with him again.)

Now your friend DID say he'd help you out if you got AMS. I am thinking that you would probably get the AMS on the way in, and turn around. If you are not actually becoming HACE-like (slurred speech, dizzy, etc), but only nauseated and unable to eat, I'd think turning you around so you could head back alone should be ok. You can't really lose the trail in the daylight. Partner could continue on to summit, and on returning, accompany you the rest of the way out. In fact, if anything happened on the way in, and you are still able to walk, then sending you out alone, with the idea of summiting and returning to help finish the exit, would seem ok. Just remember that in any of these situations, the slower hiker should always stay ON the trail, or within easy sight of the trail (only getting off to get water, etc.). If anything else, like a toilet stop, leave the day pack ON the trail, so the other party would stop. You should plan and agree on this before you separate!

However, if these "friends" are the sort who would leave you in their dust, head to the summit and exit, without ever joining you on the way out, then you are basically planning on hiking alone. If that is what they intend, and you should find out now, then make sure you know ALL aspects of the hike. You cannot depend on these people for anything. You need to carry all your food and snacks, know where to get your water, carry your own first aid and medications that might become necessary, AND hike wisely, knowing when to turn around. There are way too many stories where hikers hurry out, leaving their slowest member behind, then start whining to Doug at the store that maybe a rescue is necessary. Leaving a slow hiker on the trail can only lead to trouble.

Hiking partners should accompany the slowest ones out. If needed, stronger hikers can even carry the slowest hiker's pack. (I get pretty annoyed when the slowest refuses to give up some weight, and continues hiking out ever so slowly, delaying everyone's exit.)

Having said all that, you won't be hiking alone on the Main Mt Whitney Trail. With over 200 people per day permitted to hike, you should be ok. If you ARE hiking alone, then talking to others on the trail can help. You might be able to help someone in need, or should the opposite be the case, you can likely get help if that is necessary.

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#24656 - 06/04/12 01:12 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
+ @ti2d Offline


Registered: 10/22/09
Posts: 836
Loc: Sheridan, OR
Whitney is far from being REMOTE unless you go between November 1 and May 1...there will be plenty of people on the trail.

If your hiking partner doesn't like your "trail philosophy" then I would find another partner. I thought training partners were supposed to assist each other and push the envelope.

If your training partner is the MWT trip leader, maybe that person needs a lesson in accountability...no one gets left behind on the mountain.

I make special exceptions when my party is on the ascent and one member of my party cannot make it and decides to turn back. I ask them to leave a note or something on my windshield/wipers to let me know they got off the trail. Even a voicemail or text message suffices.

Now, if we have reached the summit and we are descending, and since I am the trip leader, it is my "responsibility" to be "sweep" making sure everyone is off that trail. I make no exceptions to this.

I have been on one hike where the trip leader finished ahead of the others. My group had to assist a hiker of his party because her knees were giving her discomfort and she was having difficulty waking.

All of us made it down, and when I went to look for the trip leader, he as asleep in his car. His door was unlocked and he got a rude awakening and I had to be restrained by the members of our party. I was pissed.

See this portion of Orientation Notes by VersatileFred Orientation Notice for Whitney first timers.

In closing, MWT hikers are a rare breed unlike anywhere in the world...we are willing to step up and step in to assist. We value living and value human life.

I got my $15.00 worth just be getting selected to hike...I want others to get their $15.00 worth.

_________________________
Journey well...

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#24657 - 06/04/12 01:14 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
wazzu Offline


Registered: 06/20/10
Posts: 319
Loc: Orange County, CA
Gelsomina,

First, you are not being a big baby to have concerns. They are very legitmate questions to ask yourself.

Second, if you are not comfortable with your hiking partner, find a new partner. You are asking good questions to your hiking partner(s). It is better to get this all worked out before you attempt Whitney.

I hike solo frequently. And did a solo hike up Whitney last year and many of the trails listed in your training schedule. The Whitney trail always has people on it, including rangers. And most hikers on the trail are willing to lend a helping hand if needed. Most of your training hikes are on popular trails and you will find that you will see plenty of people and will have little time that you will be alone.

But, that doesn't absolve anyone from being prepared to take care of themselves. (have enough food, clothing, emergency supplies, etc) Based on your postings, it sounds like you will be prepared.

As far as needing a hiking partner to be safe, ask yourself, when you twisted your ankle, would a hiking partner made a big difference in the outcome? You didn't panic and you got yourself down the hill. A partner may have given you a little more comfort knowing you were not alone, but that depends on the hiking partner. If you were with someone that was going to be angry and make all kinds of snarky remarks due to an injury, how would that help the situation? And what would a partner been able to do for you that you didn't do yourself?

You have to decide for yourself the comfort level of going solo, but based on your postings so far, it sounds like you will be fine on your training hikes and your Whitney attempt.

Wazzu

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#24659 - 06/04/12 01:49 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Gelsomina]
Akichow Offline


Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 659
Loc: SF Bay Area
There is a book on hiking Whitney that I read that devotes a section to group dynamics and communication. The bottom line: good communication and a clear understanding about expectations is an essential component to hiking with others. If you don't trust your hiking partner, you need another partner. If you trust your hiking partner, but you have different expectations, and cannot reconcile them, you need a new hiking partner. If you trust your hiking partner, and have different expectations, but can plan work-arounds solutions that work for you both, then go for it.

It is true that folks solo hike Whitney all the time. Indeed, the first time I was on Whitney, I overnighted at Outpost Camp, and then solohiked to Trail Camp (with my dog) and enjoyed it (though I did pass some very altitude-sick folks at Consultation Lake who were day hiking). As a first timer going for the summit, however, I would not have wanted to solo hike past Trail Crest. (Now that I have some knowledge of the mountain and have some experience at altitude, I would do so.) People have different comfort levels. Given the disorienting affects of AMS, and the fact that others can really help out (e.g., providing water, encouragement, taking some weight), my own view is that, unless you know the environment and are familiar with altitude, it would be better to go with a partner. I have, in fact, provided water, tylenol, electrolytes, and other support to people on Whitney who were sick on both of my summit trips on Whitney -- some of whom were in my party, and some of whom were not -- as well as on a summit trip to White.

If you are going to solo hike a 14'er your first time around, White Mountain is the way to go, particularly the first Sunday in August, which is an open house. On that day, they open the Barcroft Gate, and you hike a jeep trail 5 miles to the summit, and 5 miles back, 10 miles total (normally it is 14 miles round trip). Nice to have a car with a little bit of clearance to do the dirt road up to the trailhead, though we saw Honda Civics doing it.... When I did it (my first 14'er), I ended up going up to the summit solo when my friend turned around at 13,600 feet. There were so many people up there (because of the open house) that it felt like a walk in the park. If you do go for White, an acclimitization hike the day before in the Ancient Bristlecone Forest is highly recommended -- then sleep at the Barcroft gate that night (no water so bring your own, but there is a pit toilet).

And again, on speed of ascent: Based on my own research (largely using internet sources, but including review of some published peer-reviewed articles, but I am not an MD or researcher), I am personally totally convinced that rate of ascent is highly correlated to likelihood of getting AMS. Put simply, the faster you climb, the higher the relative risk. A slow steady pace will, comparatively, reduce your chances. (I am most definitely a tortoise, and I have yet to experience AMS on a California 14'er, though one cannot get cocky about these things, and I build in a lot of acclimatization on my hikes!)

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#24665 - 06/04/12 03:05 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: Akichow]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
I am SO GLAD I asked you guys!

It's funny you mention that link for first timers, because that is exactly why I started thinking about these particular issues in the first place! I had forwarded that link to my hiking partner last week, said I was frightened and that I wanted to make sure that he wouldn't separate from me on the trail. He came back and said "oh, there's always horror stories" and he was too busy to read the link's stories.

I admit I have concerns about my hiking partner. Thanks for addressing my concerns, it really helps put me at ease mentally, and makes me think maybe I could start looking at this MENTALLY as a solo hike.

With my hiking partner, it's probably a combination of trust and expectations. Based on our differing expectations (not agreeing on "have your back no matter what" philosophy), I asked him yesterday if we could add another person to our hiking party. He agreed, said the permit had info about possibly adding another person to our party.

This other person I trust in terms of judgement/experience (he's done Whitney, Kili, much more hiking, done over a hundred ultras and marathons), temperment (very very mellow, always nice to me, more helpful personality), and is the one who first verbalized he would "never leave you on the trail". So, I need to call the permit info # to find out how/when and if we can add another person.

And thanks for explaining more about White Mountain! I think I would be comfortable doing that alone because it's like a jeep trail, little chance of hurting my ankle. I could do that substitute that for the 6/16 or 7/14 training, both are 3-day weekends for me so I can drive, camp, and hike.

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#24666 - 06/04/12 03:19 PM Re: First timer: my training program for One-Day Whitney [Re: wazzu]
Gelsomina Offline


Registered: 05/22/12
Posts: 21
Loc: San Diego, CA
Originally Posted By: wazzu
As far as needing a hiking partner to be safe, ask yourself, when you twisted your ankle, would a hiking partner made a big difference in the outcome? You didn't panic and you got yourself down the hill. A partner may have given you a little more comfort knowing you were not alone, but that depends on the hiking partner. If you were with someone that was going to be angry and make all kinds of snarky remarks due to an injury, how would that help the situation? And what would a partner been able to do for you that you didn't do yourself?

Wazzu


I think part of it is that if I had hurt myself any worse that day, there would have been a chance I couldn't have crawled out of there one my own before nightfall. I cut my hand on the fall, and the blood had me worried because both rangers had warned of recent lion spottings. I did my best to control my fear, but it was an issue, and I know that sometimes when I get afraid my judgment goes to he77. While I was limping out, I was unreasonably afraid of the blood attracting the lion who was probably 50 miles away. :P

So, even if they were ticked at me for getting injured, they could calm me down/comforted, physically help me out, or have gone for help.

I would have still been lion bait though, ha ha. A partner wouldn't have to outrun a mountain lion, just outrun me. laugh

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